Whoops! Kamala Harris gives shout out to ‘Notorious B.I.G.’ during comments about RBG

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Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris made an embarrassing gaffe during a speech on Monday, mistakenly referring to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg as the late rapper “Notorious B.I.G.”

“She was part of our culture. Yes, we wear those Notorious B.I.G. t-shirts with a lot of pride, but since she passed, there are parents reminding their children that she helped their lives,” Harris said.

Video of the gaffe was posted online.

Harris, a California Democrat, was reportedly attempting to reference Ginsburg by a nickname her supporters had given the late Supreme Court associate justice — ‘Notorious RBG’ — who passed away earlier this month.

The Notorious B.I.G./RGB rapper gaffe Monday comes on the heels of a previous related mistake Harris made last week. When she was asked to name the best rapper alive, she answered “Tupac” — a reference to Tupac Shakur.

Only, Tupac has been dead for nearly two-and-a-half decades, having been gunned down in September 1996 in Las Vegas. But Harris and her interviewer during the NAACP’s virtual convention, CNN’s Angela Rye, simply blew off the gaffe.

Meanwhile, Notorious B.I.G., once a friend of Shakur’s who turned into a rival, was shot and killed six months later.

The reference to apparel included in Harris’ RBG gaffe was highlighted in a tweet from Emily Larson, the Washington Examiner’s politics reporter.

Harris was making remarks about President Donald Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Ginsburg. Interestingly, according to reports, Harris’ prepared remarks said “Notorious RBG.”

The California senator was widely criticized by social media users for her gaffe, which some saw as pandering to the young, black community.

Meanwhile, her presidential running mate, Joe Biden — who is slated for his first debate with President Trump on Tuesday — has a history of making gaffes and verbal mistakes as well, which appear to be increasing as the campaign season wears on ahead of the November elections.

In an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper Monday, Biden’s wife, Jill Biden, waved off questions about her husband’s gaffe-prone nature.

“Your husband has been known to make the occasional gaffe,” Tapper began, before being immediately cut off.

“Oh, you cannot even go there,” Jill Biden responded, as Tapper chuckled. “After Donald Trump you cannot even say the word ‘gaffe.’”

“Well, that’s what I wanted…I can’t even say the word ‘gaffe’?” Tapper responded

“Nope. Done. It’s gone,” Jill Biden interjected.

As for the debate, which will be held in Cleveland, one expert says, “It’s Biden’s to lose.”

“If Biden turns in a solid performance then it’s very hard for Trump, even with his best performance, to gain support,” Walter Olson, a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, told the Daily Caller. “I’d say it’s Biden’s to lose.”

Olson noted that Biden’s “reassuring, dull campaign strategy has been brilliantly effective,” adding: “It doesn’t matter so much, as long as he reminds people that Trump is worse. And if candidates haven’t changed, that’s good news for Biden.”

Still, one of Trump’s greatest strengths has been his ability to hold his own during debates and to connect with his voters, as he does on the campaign trail.

That said, first debates have historically been make-or-break for candidates.

“According to the Pew Research Center, the first Clinton-Trump debate in 2016 garnered 84 million viewers, while the third only received 71.6 million,” Douglas Braff writes. “While 71.6 million is still a staggering figure for a televised political event, no candidate wants the nearly 13 million voters to make up their minds after the first debate in case either candidate were to have performed poorly.”

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Jon Dougherty

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