George Floyd’s brother opens House hearing, calls him a ‘gentle giant’ who ‘changed the world’

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Philonise Floyd, brother of George Floyd, appeared before the Democrat-led House Judiciary Committee during a hearing on police brutality, as the party wasted little time trying to capitalize on current events.

Describing his brother as “a gentle giant,” a term once used to describe nearly 300 lb. Michael Brown, the 18-year-old man shot and killed while attacking a Ferguson, Mo., police officer, the young brother spoke of the pain of watching a video of his sibling being pinned to the ground by the knee of a Minneapolis police officer.

A moment he described as “murder.”


(Source: Fox News)

“He was our gentle giant. I was reminded of that when I watched the video of his murder,” Floyd said. “He was mild-mannered; he didn’t fight back. He listened to the officers. He called them ‘sir.’ The men who took his life, who suffocated him for eight minutes and 46 seconds. He still called him ‘sir’ as he begged for his life.”

“I can’t tell you the kind of pain you feel when you watch something like that. When you watch your big brother, who you’ve looked up to your whole entire life die — die begging for your mom,” he continued.

Reading from a prepared statement, Floyd said the reason he was at the hearing was to ensure that his brother’s death “was not in vain.”

“To make sure that his face is more than another face on a t-shirt, more than another name on the list that won’t stop growing,” he said.

“I’m tired,” Floyd said. “I’m tired of pain. Pain you feel when you watch something like that… I’m here to ask you to make it stop. Stop the pain, stop us from being tired. George called for help and he was ignored. Please listen to the call that I’m making to you now.”

Turning his attention to law enforcement, the brother called for action,

“People of all backgrounds, genders and races have come together to demand change,” Floyd said. “Honor them, honor George and make the necessary changes that make law enforcement the solution and not the problem.”

“Hold them accountable and when they do something wrong,” he continued. “Teach them what it means to treat people with empathy and respect. Teach them what necessary force is. Teach them that deadly force should be rarely, and only when life is at risk.”

Referencing the nearly two weeks of often violent protests, Floyd declared, “Enough is enough. The people marching in the streets are telling you enough is enough.”

Calling on lawmakers to make a name for themselves by ensuring that his brother didn’t die in vain, he choked up with emotion as he concluded his statement.

“If his death ends up changing the world for the better. And I think it will. I think it has. Then he died as he lived. It is on you to make sure his death isn’t in vain.”

“I didn’t get the chance to say goodbye to Perry, while he was here. I was robbed of that,” he said, Perry being what the family called George. “But I know he is looking down at us now. Perry, look at what you did big brother. You changed the world.”

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Tom Tillison

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