Mexican Barbie puts Mattel in hotseat

(Screenshot from Mattel)

Mattel’s new Barbie is causing quite a storm in woke circles.

The Dia de Los Muertos Barbie (Spanish for “Day of the Dead”) comes with a flower-printed dress and a skull pattern pasted across her face.

Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday where people say prayers and celebrate the lives of lost loved ones. Many people wear costumes and paint their faces to celebrate the day, similar to how the new Barbie is fashioned.

Some woke critics predictably took to social media to act like a new barbie doll honoring a holiday is the worst thing that has happened this year.

“Is this a bad joke or what? #Mattel toy company plans the release and promotion of a Day of the Dead barbie… Dia de los Muertos is one of our most sacred traditions in Mexico dating back to prehispanic days. STOP PRODUCTION!” one overly-excited Twitter user wrote in reaction to the release of the kid’s doll.

“Cultural Appropriation Barbie is coming out soon. Don’t worry! No proceeds will go to indigenous people that sell this kind of thing much cheaper. For only $75 you can help a multi million dollar corporation get richer!” another user wrote.

The “cultural appropriation” criticism has not hurt the popularity of the $75 doll. It sold out quickly due to high demand.

Many other social media users also pushed back against the ridiculous criticisms against the doll.

“A term used to describe the taking over of creative or artistic forms, themes, or practices by one cultural group from another. It is in general used to describe Western appropriations of non‐Western or non‐white forms, and carries connotations of exploitation and dominance,” is how “cultural appropriation” is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary.

In other words, it’s a term for people to argue for segregation of cultures and races under the guise of protecting suppressed people — which is clearly what is happening here.

Zachary Leeman

Staff Writer
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Zachary Leeman is originally from Maine, he served in the United States Army Reserve for six years. He currently lives in Nashville, Tennessee.
Zachary Leeman

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