‘It names names’: Epstein files ordered unsealed, releasing thousands of docs from defamation suit

 

(Photo by Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)

A 2015 defamation lawsuit by Jeffrey Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts Guiffre could have some of his high-profile associates and connections more nervous that a cat in a room full of rocking chairs.

On Friday, thousands of documents related to the “Guiffre v. Maxwell” lawsuit, which was settled in 2017, were ordered to unsealed, according to the Daily Beast. British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell was Epstein’s alleged madam and Guiffre sued her for defamation.

“In its opinion, the panel vacated a Manhattan federal judge’s decision to keep the records secret and ordered the summary judgment record in the 2017 case to be unsealed—with minimal redactions—after it issues a mandate closing the case,” the online news source reported.

The documents reportedly will prove Epstein trafficked underage girls to his famous friends, according to lawyers for some of the victims. The docs names names as Court House News reporter Adam Klasfeld put it:

Famous friends like Prince Andrew, who has been photographed with Guiffre — she has accused him of sexual assault. She has also claimed that Epstein, in conjunction with Maxwell, made her a sex slave and loaned her out to friends and associates.

Epstein was also friends with former President Bill Clinton, who is also linked to Maxwell.

“We applaud the Second Circuit’s decision to unseal the materials in the Guiffre v. Maxwell case,” said Giuffre attorney Sigrid McCawley, according to the Daily Beast. “This ruling is a watershed moment that helps victims of sexual abuse. It unequivocally stands for the proposition that information cannot be hidden in court filings and that the public has the right to know about the abuse of victims.”

Epstein was arrested last month on federal counts of sex trafficking and conspiracy and is being held in custody without bail.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit said on Wednesday “there is no countervailing privacy interest sufficient to justify their continued sealing.”

The Miami Herald had asked for the release of all sealed or redacted documents in Giuffre’s case, which was filed in the Southern District of New York — Maxwell fought to keep them sealed and was joined in that effort in March by mystery parties, identified in court records as “J. Doe” and “John Doe,” the Daily Beast reported.

These mystery parties cited “unadjudicated allegations against third persons.”

The appellate court’s summary judgement noted some information that would still be redacted.

“Upon issuance of our mandate, a minimally redacted version of the summary judgment record will be made accessible on the Court of Appeals docket,” the judges stated. “We have implemented minimal redactions to protect personally identifying information such as personal phone numbers, contact lists, birth dates, and social security numbers. We have also redacted the names of alleged minor victims of sexual abuse from deposition testimony and police reports, as well as deposition responses concerning intimate matters where the questions were likely only permitted—and the responses only compelled—because of a strong expectation of continued confidentiality.”

Expect much more on this in the days and weeks ahead.

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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