‘Victim or Vixen?’ Monica Lewinsky, definitely not done with Bill Clinton. Her new project sparks mad tongue-wagging

Monica Lewinsky is tired of having other people tell her story.

So Lewinsky blasted former President Bill Clinton and the media in an essay detailing why she chose to participate in a new documentary that details her affair with Clinton and his eventual impeachment.

Writing for Vanity Fair, the former White House intern tackled the question of “who gets to live in Victimville,” powerfully facing off against her experiences and the 1998 investigation that forever changed her life.

“Victim or Vixen? That’s a question as old as time immemorial: Madonna or Whore? Predator or Prey? Dressed scantily or appropriately? Is she telling the truth or lying? (Who will believe thee, Isabel?) And it’s a question that is still debated about women in general. And about me,” Lewinsky wrote in an essay published Tuesday.

She also tackled the question of why she chose to be part of the A&E six-part docu-series titled “The Clinton Affair.”

The debate over who gets to live in Victimville fascinates me, as a public person who has watched strangers discuss my own “victim” status at length on social media. The person at the epicenter of the experience doesn’t necessarily get to decide. No—society, like a Greek chorus, also has a say in this classification. (Whether we should or shouldn’t is a debate for another time.) And society will no doubt weigh in again on my classification—Victim or Vixen?—when people see a new docuseries I chose to participate in. (It’s titled The Clinton Affair. Bye-bye, Lewinsky scandal . . . I think 20 years is enough time to carry that mantle.)

 

She explained how the emotionally painful process – which included more than 20 hours of interviews – was necessary for her healing.

“An important part of moving forward is excavating, often painfully, what has gone before,” she wrote.

Lewinsky intensely described the “grief” she felt over the hurt, betrayal and shame.

“Grief for a relationship that had no normal closure, and instead was slowly dismantled by two decades of Bill Clinton’s behavior that eventually (eventually!) helped me understand how, at 22, I took the small, narrow sliver of the man I knew and mistook it for the whole,” she wrote.

(Image: Wikimedia)

She recalled Clinton’s denial of the affair and the subsequent “demonization of Monica Lewinsky” by those around the president and by the media. But Lewinsky noted that 2018 brought a new perspective, and new scrutiny amid the #MeToo movement and demands by vocal feminists.

“For the first time in more than 15 years, Bill Clinton was being asked directly about what transpired. If you want to know what power looks like, watch a man safely, even smugly, do interviews for decades, without ever worrying whether he will be asked the questions he doesn’t want to answer,” she wrote, referring to an NBC interview in June in which Clinton said he didn’t owe Lewinsky an apology.

The now 45-year-old Lewinsky  believes Clinton should “want to apologize” and revealed that she participated in the documentary series – which premieres Sunday, November 18 on A&E –  to be able to tell her own story.

“Yes, the process of filming has been exceedingly painful. But I hope that by participating, by telling the truth about a time in my life—a time in our history—I can help ensure that what happened to me never happens to another young person in our country again,” she wrote. “So, Victim or Vixen? Maybe, in 2018, it’s a question we should no longer be asking.”

Almost proving her point, the left has come out against Lewinsky, blaming her and claiming she is re-hashing old news.

Others were impressed by the powerful piece in Vanity Fair and called out the left’s double standard.

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Frieda Powers

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