Palin to Holder on gun bracelets: ‘You don’t want to go there, buddy’

Sarah Palin threw down the gauntlet Wednesday when she took to Facebook to challenge Attorney General Eric Holder’s comment about the possible use of gun bracelets.

The former governor of Alaska wrote on her Facebook page: “Eric, you can replace my identifying bracelets with your government marker when you pry them off my cold, dead wrists.”

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Holder, a gun control advocate, told a House appropriations subcommittee on Friday that the Justice Department wants to explore technological innovations, to include gun bracelets, to see how “guns can be made more safe.”

palin-bracelets

The ideal behind the technology is that a gun will only operate if the user is wearing an electronic bracelet tied to the weapon.

Palin also included a photo of three bracelets she routinely wears in her post, with an explanation of what each one represents.

Hey Eric, these are my identifying bracelets:

One honors our military;

One honors independent Americans who have a healthy distrust of Washington’s permanent political class and who will fight against elitists hell-bent on fundamentally transforming the USA;

And one celebrates the year 1791 – that glorious year our Bill of Rights came to be, with the cross and bones symbol representing our Founders’ “Death to Tyranny” commitment, and on each side you’ll see symbols of my faith. Complete with Swarovski crystals, I might add.”

The description was followed by her comment that Holder would have to pry her identifying bracelets off her “cold, dead wrists” —  no wiggle room there.

“And, Eric, “You don’t want to go there, buddy,” she added.

The comment is a play on Holder’s reaction to Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, who said at a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday that “contempt is not a big deal to our attorney general.”

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
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The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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