Doctors sound alarm over ‘sleepy chicken’ social media trend

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A disturbing new online trend shows some are ringing the dinner bell with something new – and blue – on their plates called “sleepy chicken.”

The TikTok generation is now trippin’ on some chicken infused with a cold and flu medicine.

Videos show users creating the unique and dangerous dish by braising a chicken breast in up to half a bottle of NyQuil.

The video below shows one person making the dish and is set to a Spanish rap song that belts out lyrics about pot and “lots” of cocaine.

@systemofaclown69♬ sonido original – Lucianeka

General practitioner in England, Dr. Jeff Foster, suggested in an interview with The Sun that social media is not the right source for medical information while taking a shot at anti-vaxxers.

“It tends to bring out the worst in some cases, hence the Darwinian approach of anti-vaxxers who obtain their medical ‘research’ from such sources as Facebook and Instagram,” he said.

To be clear, you would be hard-pressed to find an “expert” who suggests braising chicken in NyQuil is a good idea. This is distinctly different from the “anti-vaccine” crowd that is largely concerned about the suppression of scientific discourse from experts like Dr. Robert Malone, a prominent virologist who played a role in developing the mRNA vaccine technology but was recently banned from Twitter because he suggested putting the brakes on injecting our children – whose risk of the COVID-19 virus has been greatly exaggerated – with an irreversible jab.

“The case of NyQuil chicken is no different,” Foster said. “The idea that by saturating any food product in a medicine believing that it will provide some novel health benefit or cure is not just stupid, but incredibly dangerous.”

“We have doses on medicines for a reason. If you soak a food in it, and then cook it, you are very likely to overdose or at least have no idea what dose you are getting,” Foster explained. “By taking more than you should, you run the real risk of acute liver poisoning, as well as dizziness, vomiting, seizures, and death.”

“By cooking the food you remove the water and any other liquid in there that gives an idea of dose so you just get a super concentrated dose,” Foster said. “You would never dream of taking a whole box of paracetamol in one go, and yet there is really little difference. The safety risk is just so unbelievably high.”

There were plenty of people questioning the frightening viral trend on social media.

Dr. Aaron Hartman, a professor of medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University, agreed that the “sleepy chicken” trend poses grave dangers.

“When you cook cough medicine like NyQuil, you boil off the water and alcohol in it, leaving the chicken saturated with a super concentrated amount of drugs in the meat,” he explained.

“If you ate one of those cutlets completely cooked, it’d be as if you’re actually consuming a quarter to half a bottle of NyQuil,” he added.

The dangers aren’t just associated with eating the chicken, and Hartman explained that the fumes can cause problems as well.

“Inhaled, these medicines also enter your bloodstream really quickly and are not going past your liver for detoxification. The effects can be quite bad depending on how much you inhale”, the doctor said.

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Ashley Hill

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