Judge drops bomb on federal vax mandate, points out major contradictions

CHECK OUT WeThePeople.store and WeThePeople.wine for holiday gifts and awesome snarky swag!

A Louisiana judge ruled against a federal vaccine mandate for healthcare workers on Tuesday, while pointing out the inconsistencies and contradictions of the federal rule, ultimately halting its implementation.

Louisiana U.S. District Judge Terry Doughty’s ruling is consistent with that of Missouri U.S. District Judge Matthew Schelp, who delivered a similar decision on Monday that blocked mandates in 10 states.

“If boosters are needed six months after being ‘fully vaccinated,’ then how good are the COVID-19 vaccines, and why is it necessary to mandate them?” Judge Doughty asked in his ruling.

The State of Louisiana, By … by Jim Hoft

The complainant cited Dr. Peter A. McCullough in its’ conclusion that the vaccine does not prevent the transmission of the coronavirus among vaccinated or unvaccinated people– which would render a mandate of the ineffective inoculation moot.

“The COVID-19 vaccines do not prevent transmission of the disease among the vaccinated or mixed vaccinated/unvaccinated populations – mandatory COVID-19 vaccines for hospitals do not increase safety for employees or hospital patients. McCullough declared that additional treatment with other drugs and supplements has resulted in an 85% reduction in hospitalizations and death of high-risk individuals presenting with COVID-19,” the complainant stated.

McCullough also pointed out the vaccine’s inability to protect recipients from the Delta variant. And with a new variant, omicron emerging many are left questioning the vaccine in spite of corporate and federal mandates.

“In other words, even if you are fully vaccinated, you still may become infected with the COVID-19 virus,” Judge Doughty wrote in his ruling.

“If the separation of powers meant anything to the Constitutional framers, it meant that the three necessary ingredients to deprive a person of liberty or property–the power to make rules, to enforce them, and to judge their violations– could never fall into the same hands,” the judge continued. “If the Executive branch is allowed to usurp the power of the Legislative branch to make laws, two of the three powers conferred by the Constitution would be in the same hands.”

“If human nature and history teach anything, it is that civil liberties face grave risks when governments proclaim indefinite states of emergency,” Doughty warned.

“Although CMS spent pages and pages attempting to explain the need for mandatory COVID-19 vaccines, when infection and hospitalizations rates are dropping, millions of people have already been infected, developing some form of natural immunity, and when people who have been fully vaccinated still become infected, mandatory vaccines as the only method of prevention make no sense,” the ruling read.

Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry praised Doughty’s ruling in a statement and took a shot at the Biden administration for “villainiz[ing] our healthcare heroes with his ‘jab or job’ edicts.”

“While our fight is far from over, I am pleased the Court granted preliminary relief against the President’s unconstitutional and immoral attack on not only our healthcare workers but also the access to healthcare services for our poor and elderly,” Landry wrote. “I will see this case through to the end – fighting every step of the way to prevent the federal government from imposing medical tyranny on our citizens and turning last year’s healthcare heroes into this year’s unemployed.”

The preliminary injunction against the CMS rule stops the forced vaccination of nearly every full-time employee, part-time employee, volunteer, and contractor working at healthcare facilities receiving Medicaid or Medicaid funding.

Comments

Latest Articles