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‘Pure insanity’: NYT serves us Thanksgiving advice that kids who aren’t fully vaxxed should ‘eat quickly’

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The New York Times served up some COVID-19-related Thanksgiving advice that, if anyone follows it, could lead to the kids’ table emptying out fast after they gobble their food.

The context is that a reader posed the following question which was answered by a Times expert:

“If our child, 9, and a cousin, 10, have each received one dose of the vaccine two weeks prior to Thanksgiving, is it safe for us to eat indoors? There will be about 20 guests, all vaccinated, and the 65 and older crowd have all received boosters.”

Virginia Tech University engineering professor Linsey Marr responded by implying techniques such as masking, dining and dashing, and social distancing.

“I’m glad to hear that the children and all guests are vaccinated. As the kids will not be fully vaccinated until two weeks after their second shot, I think some care is warranted, especially because some attendees are 65 and older and thus at greater risk of more serious breakthrough infections. You could have the kids wear masks, eat quickly and stay away from the older adults when eating.”

Prof. Marr studies the airborne transmission of viruses, according to the news outlet.

Thanksgiving is usually a time for family and friends to get together in the same room to share good food, and a few adult beverages for the adults, while forgetting about day-to-day concerns, but it seems the Times has other ideas. One alternative topic conversation might be how food prices have skyrocketed since the Biden administration was ushered in.

The Times, of course, is the same corporate media platform that won a Pulitzer Prize for its reporting on the now-discredited Russiagate scandal.

Social media reportedly found the Thanksgiving advice was indigestion-inducing, with some describing it as insane or a reason to stay away from any holiday party that would follow the Times’ lead. “How about if you’re that worried, you don’t go to Thanksgiving since the whole point of the holiday is to break bread together,” wrote one representative Twitter user.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Because many generations tend to gather to celebrate holidays, the best way to minimize COVID-19 risk and keep your family and friends safer is to get vaccinated if you’re eligible” and “Protect those not yet eligible for vaccination such as young children by getting yourself and other eligible people around them vaccinated.”.

Earlier this year, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky told CNN that the vaccines can’t “prevent transmission” of the virus although “They continue to work well with delta with regard to severe illness and death.”

The CDC has endorsed a third shot, a so-called booster, for those 18 and over.

According to a study, the efficacy of one of the vaccine varieties may wane after just six months.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has implied that the definition of “fully vaccinated” could require the booster shot. Fauci, who seems to spend a lot of his time on TV perhaps rather than looking through a microscope, studying a broad range of data, or treating actual patients, is encouraging everyone to get vaccinated or boosted prior to holiday gatherings.

Here are some additional social media responses to the Times advice:

Robert Jonathan

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