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Support for Black Lives Matter craters in US much like Biden, who sees approval rating tank in Iowa

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A new survey has found that nationwide, support for the Black Lives Matter movement has dropped significantly after rising just as dramatically 18 months ago following the death of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer.

According to the survey, which was conducted by Civiqs, an online survey firm with ties to far-left media group Daily Kos, 44 percent of those who responded currently support BLM generally.

But that level of support has declined from a high of 52 percent of respondents who expressed support after Floyd was killed, the New York Post reported.

At the same time, BLM is falling out of favor with a higher number of people; the survey found that 44 percent are currently opposed to the movement, which is way up from just 28 percent who voiced opposition in the days after Floyd’s death at the hands of former police office Derek Chauvin.

The survey found that 11 percent of respondents said they neither supported the organization nor opposed it, while 1 percent were uncertain.

Most respondents — more than half — who oppose BLM are white, while support for the group among blacks is at 82 percent, according to Civiqs.

The group was first founded in 2013 following the death of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., who was shot and killed by a neighborhood watch leader, George Zimmerman.

Zimmerman was charged with murder but was acquitted by a jury.

Meanwhile, support for President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris continues to crater as well.

A new survey out of Iowa, where the first-in-the-nation primaries are held, found that Biden’s approval rating is a dismal 33 percent, The Hill reported.

The Des Moines Register-Mediacom Iowa poll had Biden with a 47-percent job approval rating in March.

“The highest support Biden received was for his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic at 41 percent,” The Hill reported, citing the survey.

Fewer than one-in-five voters in Iowa, or 22 percent, gave Biden a good approval rating for his handling of the evacuation from Afghanistan, while about one-in-four, or 24 percent, rate him positively for his handling of the ongoing migrant crisis.

Thirty-two percent gave Biden high marks for his handling of the economy while only 28 percent rate him favorably for criminal justice.

Both of the state’s U.S. senators — Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst, both Republicans — rate far higher than Biden at 45 percent each. The highest-rated politician in the state, however, is GOP Gov. Kim Reynolds with 51 percent.

“The survey found [former President Donald] Trump would receive 51 percent support in Iowa in the 2024 election, while Biden would only get 40 percent support in the state,” The Hill reported, adding that Biden has said he expected to run again in 2024.

Trump, however, has not said whether he will run next time around, though he has dropped several hints that he is considering it. Several of his allies have also hinted he will run but that he is currently awaiting the results of the 2022 midterms to see how the GOP performs.

Jon Dougherty

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