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Unvaccinated NIAID scientist says Fauci mandate strategy is ‘wrong,’ will argue against forced jabs

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Dr. Anthony Fauci’s workplace, the National Institutes of Health, has scheduled a seminar on the ethics of mandates featuring a senior researcher who is pushing back against forced jabs.

That’s according to The Wall Street Journal, which reported that the NIH will live-stream a Dec. 1 roundtable session debating the ethics of vaccine mandates. Matthew Memoli, a 16-year NIH veteran who is unvaccinated, will argue against forced vaccinations.

David Wendler, a senior NIH bioethicist in charge of planning the session, told WSJ: “There’s a lot of debate within the NIH about whether [a vaccine mandate] is appropriate. It’s an important, hot topic.”

The newspaper said that all NIH employees are included in President Biden’s Nov. 22 deadline for federal employees and will be required to be vaccinated, adding that “while 88 percent of the agency’s employees have been fully vaccinated, Memoli applied for a religious exemption and has said that he would risk termination over the mandate.”

Memoli, who heads a National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease research team, told Fauci, the director of the NIAID, in a July email he found mandated vaccinations “extraordinarily problematic,” The Hill reported.

“I think the way we are using the vaccines is wrong,” Memoli told his boss.

While he applied for an exemption, Memoli favors vaccinations among those with underlying conditions that may compromise their immune systems. But he argues that widespread vaccination “could hinder the development of a natural, robust immunity gained through infection,” the political news website added.

The 48-year-old scientist has said he will support the results of the ethics discussion regardless of the outcome.

“I do vaccine trials. I, in fact, help create vaccines,” he told WSJ. “Part of my career is to share my expert opinions, right or wrong.…I mean, if they all end up saying I’m wrong, that’s fine. I want to have the discussion.”

Having the debate at all is remarkable in and of itself, given the censorship that has been seen in the country over the past year when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. Posting alternative views on the matter is verboten on all the major social media platforms and could result in being suspended. Even from accredited doctors and other health professionals.

Over the weekend, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily halted Biden’s employer vaccine mandate. In issuing a stay against the emergency order that would be enforced by OSHA, the three-judge panel cited “grave statutory and constitutional issues” in the decision, giving the administration until Monday to respond with the prospect of an injunction against the mandate a possibility.

The court’s ruling comes in response to challenges filed against the order that will punish employers of over 100 workers with stiff fines for non-compliance.

On Monday, White House deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre effectively encouraged businesses to ignore the legally binding court-ordered stay and proceed with the vaccine and testing requirements for private businesses.

It is now clear that those who have been vaccinated can still contract the virus AND spread it, with studies showing that the effectiveness of the vaccine diminishes over time.

In August, in the lead-up to booster shots, The Washington Post cited a trio of studies published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to report that the vaccines “show declining effectiveness against infection overall but strong protection against hospitalization.”

The article quoted CDC director Rochelle Walensky: “Examining numerous cohorts through the end of July and early August, three points are now very clear. First, vaccine-induced protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection begins to decrease over time. Second, vaccine effectiveness against severe disease, hospitalization and death remains relatively high. And third, vaccine effectiveness is generally decreased against the delta variant.”

Tom Tillison

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