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‘SNL’ cold open suggests wedge between Youngkin, Trump; new cast member debuts canny impression of former president

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The cold open for ‘Saturday Night Live’ featured a mock interview with Fox News’ Judge Jeanine Pirro that parodied former President Donald Trump, Virginia’s GOP Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, and Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

As the show opened, Rodgers was first ridiculed over comments that he made this week regarding the COVID-19 vaccine, revealing that he, in fact, had not gotten a vaccine, per the NFL’s mandate, but rather said earlier he was “immunized,” which left most observers thinking he had gotten the jab.

“Now Aaron, you’re not vaccinated. So what? Who the hell cares?” the SNL Pirro started off. “It’s your body, your choice. And please never use that quote for any other issues.”

“Exactly Jeanine. It’s my body and my COVID,” said the SNL Rodgers, who was being played by cast member Pete Davidson. “I can give it to whoever I want. But suddenly the woke mob is coming after me. It’s gotten so bad, State Farm called and they’re not giving me the Aaron Rodgers break.”

Davidson as Rodgers then referenced his claim that he didn’t lie to a reporter when asked if he’d been vaccinated, responding, “Yeah, I’ve been immunized.”

“I never lied,” said Rodgers. “I took all my teammates into a huddle, got all their faces three inches away from my wet mouth, and told them, ‘Trust me. I’m more or less immunized.’ Go team!”

From there, SNL Pirro brought in Youngkin as a guest, turning to his victory last week in the Old Dominion State, defeating former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe.

“My win in Virginia proves that people are deeply concerned about education,” Youngkin said.

“And who are most of your voters?” asked Pirro.

“People who didn’t go to college,” Youngkin quipped.

“Excellent!” Pirro responded. “Now, critical race theory is something you talked about a lot. What is critical race theory?”

“It’s simple, it’s what got me elected,” Youngkin explained.

The cast then moved on, mocking parental concerns regarding certain books in school libraries including “Beloved” by Toni Morrison, which caused great debate among parents in Virginia and was used in a Youngkin campaign ad.

“I just wanted to congratulation Glenn Youngkin and mostly myself on a tremendous win in Virginia,” cast member James Austin Johnson said as he debuted his portrayal of the 45th president. “We did it together.”

“Oh, you don’t have to say that,” said Youngkin’s character, acting visibly uncomfortable.

Moments later, Pirro asked Johnson’s Trump character, “Mr. President, you never actually campaigned with Glenn Youngkin, did you?”

He responded that though he was “never there, there,” with the governor-elect, he “told lots of people they should vote for Glenn.”

“And you know what, most people don’t like Glenn, but he’s a wonderful guy,” said Johnson’s Trump. “He’s a wonderful guy. Tall, he’s rich. Like my sons, Glenn. You’re like my son, okay?”

“Please don’t say that,” the faux Youngkin responded nervously.

Trump endorsed Youngkin early in the race but did not campaign with him. A few days before the election, he participated in a call-in tele-rally that Youngkin did not attend.

The education issue was big for the governor-elect, however, after pledging to rid Virginia schools of critical race theory, which he believes is divisive and racist in and of itself towards whites. For months prior to the election, Loudoun County’s public schools had become a national focal point for anti-CRT activism and parental rights.

Jon Dougherty

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