Powered by Topple

Juan Williams raked for piece: ‘Parents’ rights’ is code for white race politics

Powered by Topple

Political analyst Juan Williams may have exited “The Five” on the Fox News Channel, but he is still pushing some questionable and perhaps outdated liberal narratives to help Democrats that he became known for on the show.

Williams, who still works for the network out of the D.C. bureau rather than appearing in person on the popular New York City-based program, implied that the GOP is exploiting concerns about critical race theory as a mere tactic to scare parents in Virginia and, by extension elsewhere, on the eve of the nationally watched gubernatorial election in the Old Dominion state.

“Critical Race Theory — broadly, a focus on racial disparities as a fact of American life — is not explicitly taught in Virginia’s public schools or anywhere in American public schools. But Republicans nationwide have made it a boogeyman to excite racial divisions and get their base to the polls,” Williams also wrote, in part, in an op-ed on The Hill website, although his research may be incomplete.

In a form of projection that liberals have become known for especially recently, Williams, in the article headlined “‘Parents’ rights’ is code for white race politics,” also accused “smear merchant” Glenn Youngkin, the GOP standard-bearer in Virginia, of using “divisive racial politics” in his campaign that emphasizes those parental rights.

Youngkin has vowed to ban CRT if he is elected. “We will teach all history, the good and the bad,” but not “through a lens of race,” he has asserted.

Williams quoted Youngkin’s Democrat rival Terry McAuliffe, who is trying to make the Virginia election about POTUS 45, who said the following: “Youngkin’s closing message of book banning and silencing esteemed Black authors is a racist dog whistle designed to gin up support from the most extreme elements of his party — mainly his top endorser and surrogate, Donald Trump.”

The latest aggregate of five polls tracked by Real Clear Politics gives Youngkin a slight edge over vaccine hawk, teachers’ union fanboy McAuliffe. The election is taking place in a purple-trending-to-blue state that under the Democrats repealed Virginia’s voter ID law in 2020 and allows for ballot harvesting.

Although time will tell, the direction of polling data in the election seemed to turn in favor of Youngkin when McAuliffe previously insisted during a debate that “I don’t think parents should be telling schools what they should teach.”

In a detailed Twitter thread, tireless journalist and CRT whistleblower Chris Rufo provided receipts that appeared to debunk an attempt by McAuliffe, a former governor and Clinton crony, to play the semantics card, adding that “McAuliffe himself was the first Virginia governor to promote CRT.”

In his editorial that recalled the horrible event several years ago in the state and seemed to connect that with the GOP’s “new and improved ‘Culture War’ campaign for 2021,” Williams slammed Trump “who famously said there were ‘very fine people’ on both sides of the violence sparked by ‘Unite the Right,’ the 2017 rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Va.”

Whether someone is a fan or foe of Trump, “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams is among those who have debunked that out-of-context claim by noting that the-then president also said “I’m not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally.”

“My point is that Trump could have been right or wrong about who attended, but it doesn’t change the fact that his words clearly and unambiguously condemned the marching racists while excluding them from his ‘fine people’ category,” Adams wrote.

Twitter users are raising questions about Juan Williams’ form of journalism. Here is a sampling of the huge response to his article:

Robert Jonathan

Comments

Latest Articles