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‘It’s never going to stop’: CDC director says vaccinated kids should still be required to mask up in schools

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Warning of complacency, Dr. Rochelle Walensky says that kids in the K-12 setting need to continue to mask up for the foreseeable future, a pronouncement that many Twitter users hardly consider a breath of fresh air.

During a press briefing, the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicated that the federal government is working toward scaling up a “pediatric” vaccination program.

“That said,” Walensky continued, “it will take some time, and…as we head into these winter months, we know we cannot be complacent. We also know that from previous data that schools that have had mask mandates in place were 3-1/2 times less likely to have school outbreaks requiring school closure. So right now, we are going to continue to recommend masks in all schools for all people in those schools…”

The CDC recommends schoolchildren 12 and older get the COVID-19 vaccination (this age group is currently eligible for the Pfizer variety). From the sounds of it, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization for those in the ages 5-11 cohort could be right around the corner. Calif. Gov. Gavin Newsom has already imposed a vaccine mandate on public and private grades 7 and up, prompting protests by thousands of parents and teachers.

Watch:

Under current CDC guidance, “Due to the circulating and highly contagious Delta variant, CDC recommends universal indoor masking by all students (age 2 and older), staff, teachers, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status.

“In addition to universal indoor masking, CDC recommends schools maintain at least 3 feet of physical distance between students within classrooms to reduce transmission risk.”

Back in August, the liberal New York magazine, in an article headlined “The Science of Masking Kids at School Remains Uncertain,” called attention to an underpublicized CDC study of 90,000-plus elementary-school students in 169 Georgia schools.

“Distancing, hybrid models, classroom barriers, HEPA filters, and, most notably, requiring student masking were each found to not have a statistically significant benefit. In other words, these measures could not be said to be effective,” the magazine claimed. The principal conclusions of the CDC report included that masking up teachers and staff reduced COVID incidence by 37 percent. Improved ventilation lowered the incidence by 39 percent.

Earlier this month in the sound bite embedded below, Dr. Walensky told CNN that the COVID vaccines no longer can prevent the transmission of the virus, even though the shots are otherwise working “exceptionally well.” Under certain circumstances that she outlined, masks are a good idea in crowded indoor settings, Walensky asserted.

Critics of vaccine and mask mandates during the pandemic have consistently maintained that these initiatives are more about control of the populace rather than public health. Walensky’s latest statement is hardly going over well with them with that in mind. Here is a sampling:

Robert Jonathan

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