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Feds charge former Dem staffer for years-long election fraud scheme

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Federal prosecutors have charged an ex-staffer in a Philadelphia city councilman’s office with election fraud.

The staffer allegedly participated in a “conspiracy” purportedly with a former Democrat congressman who is only identified in legal filings as Consultant #1.

Marie Beren, 67, who retired from the job with Democrat council member Mark Squilla in September, reportedly faces four counts of voter fraud and related charges.

“The consultant is reportedly Ozzie Myers, the former Philly pol with a very storied and problematic history,” Philadelphia Magazine reported.

Michael “Ozzie” Myers was one of the politicians implicated in the Abscam bribery scandal in the 1980s. He was subsequently expelled from Congress and later sentenced to three years in federal prison. Last July, he was charged with allegedly paying an election judge to stuff the ballot box for three local candidates. Domenick J. Demuro, an election judge, previously pleaded guilty in the case and is reportedly assisting the prosecution in the case against Myers.

Myers is reportedly facing additional charges in connection with the Beren matter.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, the consultant allegedly enabled Beren to first become a Democrat committee person, and later an election judge, in South Philly’s 39th Ward. In 2015, Beren allegedly appointed a hand-picked successor when she became a poll watcher but was still effectively the boss of ward activities.

The purported shenanigans allegedly ran from 2015 through 2019 and impacted local, statewide, and federal candidates, according to the news outlet:

When Election Day came around, the consultant would drive Beren to the polling place in the morning, giving her instructions along the way. According to the feds, Beren perpetuated the voter fraud in a variety of ways.

She would allegedly advise in-person voters how to vote, a violation of election law. She allegedly cast fraudulent votes herself in place of voters she knew wouldn’t be coming to the polls. (The government doesn’t make clear how she knew they wouldn’t show up.) The government also alleges that she would encourage and permit in-person voters to vote on behalf of absent family members, “steering” those voters in support of the consultant’s candidates of choice.

Beren and others, who are unnamed in the criminal complaint, falsified the “voting book” for the day, writing down names of voters who didn’t actually show up so that the count would all make sense at the end of the day.

Prosecutors haven’t specified exactly how many fraudulent votes Beren allegedly cast or caused to be cast or whether these votes had any impact on the results of an election.

“Myers sometimes directed Beren in the middle of Election Day to shift her efforts from one of Myers’ preferred candidates to another if Myers’ concluded that his first choice was comfortably ahead,’ authorities said,” the Philadelphia Inquirer added.

Given the time frame, the above-referenced charges, which are unproven unless or until they are adjudicated in a court of law, seem to have nothing to with the last year’s presidential contest.

On a statewide basis, Democrat officials also made changes to Pennsylvania voting procedures, which included universal mail-in ballots, without obtaining approval from the state legislature.

The mainstream corporate media has consistently maintained that there was no “widespread” fraud in Election 2020 and frowns on any alternative narrative.

Right on cue, the Inquirer explained that “No evidence has surfaced of widespread voter fraud that has swayed any recent election. In Myers’ case, despite the seriousness of the allegations, prosecutors have not alleged that the votes purportedly added by Demuro and Beren in South Philadelphia’s 39th Ward were enough to tip the balance in their district, let alone the city, in favor of Myers’ preferred candidate.”

Robert Jonathan

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