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Superman actor Dean Cain slams decision to make the beloved Man of Steel a bisexual

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Dean Cain suggests that DC Comics is jumping on the superficial, corporate media-style, virtue-signaling bandwagon with the revelation that the new Superman is coming out as bisexual and will enter into a relationship with a male friend.

The Man of Steel’s new persona and narrative constitutes a missed opportunity to highlight the real evil occurring in the world, the actor also insisted.

Cain, who memorably played Superman and alter ego Clark Kent on “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” which aired on ABC television from September 1993 to June 1997, said during an appearance on “Fox & Friends First” that “From what I can gather, it’s Lois and Clark’s son Jon, and…they said it’s a bold, new direction. I say they’re bandwagoning.”

“Robin of Batman and Robin just came out as bi or gay recently, and honestly, who’s really shocked about that one?…The new Captain America is gay. My daughter in [the TV series] ‘Supergirl,’ where I played the father, she was gay. So I don’t think it’s bold or brave or some crazy new direction. If they had done this 20 years ago, perhaps that would have been bold or brave,” Cain continued.

Watch:

(Video: Fox News)

The actor, who was speaking to Fox News from his home in Spain, also cast doubt on the planned storyline, which appears to consist of warmed over, as it were, leftist platitudes.

“But brave would be having him fight for the rights of gay people in Iran where they’ll throw you off a building for the offense of being gay. They’re talking about him fighting real-world problems like climate change or deportation of refugees. He’ll be dating a hactkivist, whatever a hacktivist is, I don’t know,” he added.

“Why don’t they have him fight the injustices that created the refugees whose deportation he’s protesting? That would be brave; I’d read that. Or fighting for the rights of women to attend school and have the ability to work and live and boys not to be raped by men under the new ‘warm-and-fuzzy’ Taliban; that would be brave,” Cain asserted.

“There’s real evil in this world today, real corruption and government overreach. Plenty of things to fight against. Human trafficking; real actual slavery going on. It’d be great to tackle those issues; shine a light on those issues…I’d like to see the character doing that. I’d read that comic.

This one, I don’t think I’ll be reading; I could just watch CNN or MSNBC to get this information,” he quipped.

The “Fox & Friends First” co-host noted as the interview concluded that the planned content “is bravery for the left; it’s not bravery for the world. And Superman used to fight all injustice…there’s a lot of injustice, including against gay individuals that needs to be rectified, yet Superman is not focused on that right now and probably should be.”

Back in July, Cain suggested that Captain America should get demoted to lieutenant, or possibly even private after Marvel Comics came out with an issue within which the latter super-woke hero claimed that the American Dream doesn’t exist.

“I love Captain America; I love the concept of Captain America, but I am so tired of all of this wokeness and anti-Americanism,” Cain told the “Fox & Friends” crew at the time.

When watching a TV show or movie, or even picking up a comic, many consumers in general often look for content that will provide an escape from, for example, identity politics that have become pervasive in the entertainment sector.

Superman writer Tom Taylor told IGN earlier this week that “Over the years in this industry, it probably won’t surprise you to hear I’ve had queer characters and storylines rejected. I felt like I was letting down people I loved every time this happened. But we are in a very different and much more welcome place today than we were ten, or even five years ago.

“When I was asked if I wanted to write a new Superman with a new #1 for the DC Universe, I knew replacing Clark with another straight white savior could be a real opportunity missed,” Taylor added. “I’ve always said everyone needs heroes and everyone deserves to see themselves in their heroes. Today, Superman, the strongest superhero on the planet, is coming out.”

 

Robert Jonathan

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