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CNN’s Jake Tapper sheepishly discloses ‘G-rated’ date he had with Monica Lewinsky depicted in FX series

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CNN anchor Jake Tapper was fully transparent about something for once on his Tuesday night show where he disclosed a “G-rated” date he had with Monica Lewinsky during an interview about her new HBO documentary.

Lewinsky joined “The Lead with Jake Tapper” to discuss her involvement in two projects, an HBO Max documentary called “15 Minutes of Shame” and the FX docu-series, “Impeachment: American Crime Story.”

“First of all, Monica, yes, I have to disclose, full disclosure in tonight’s episode, our G-rated date from December 1997,” Tapper admitted at the start of the interview.

“Our one date,” Lewinsky joked back.

(Source: CNN)

“Our one date from 1997 is portrayed, I should note, by an actor way better looking than me now or then,” Tapper added.

Just a few hours after the CNN host’s interview with Lewinsky, the fifth episode of the FX series aired and featured a reenactment of the “G-rated” date.

Chris Riggi, the actor who plays Tapper, is shown sitting at a bar with a friend at a Mexican restaurant in D.C. where Lewinsky, played by Beanie Feldstein, catches his eye as she sits alone.

“The girl in the purple seems kind of cute,” Tapper’s character says.

“I think she used to work at the White House a couple of years ago,” Tapper’s friend responds.

In the scene, the now-CNN anchor approaches Lewinsky, trying to give off what he described as “an air of unapproachability.”

“Was I successful?” Tapper asked.

“Oh, yes. Good job,” Lewinsky’s character playfully answered.

“Good, good. I’m Jake, Jake Tapper,” the character said.

“I’m Monica,” Lewinsky responded, introducing herself.

Lewinsky produced both the HBO documentary and the FX series.

During the segment on Tapper’s CNN show, the host asked the new producer why she was open to showing the unglamorous parts of her life on the big screen.

“I felt that I shouldn’t get a pass as a producer. I think, first of all, I shouldn’t get a pass in general. You know, I think it’s important to take responsibility for mistakes and I’ve worked hard to work through those,” Lewinsky began.

“But, in particular, with the show, there’s so many people who’ve worked hard on the show. And I — it was important to me that the credibility of the show be there. And I felt that if I was sort of smoothing over and photoshopping, essentially, my history in that way that it wasn’t right and wouldn’t be fair to everybody,” she added.

Tapper noted that Lewinsky does not portray herself as a victim in the show, but Former President Bill Clinton is portrayed as a “predator.”

“I think we’re seeing aspects of Bill that we haven’t seen before. And I think that it’s, you know, I certainly — it wasn’t considered a victim back then. And I, you know, dance around the victim language a lot,” Lewinsky said.

The former White House intern spoke about the importance of consent and the “power differentials” between herself and Clinton at the time.

“I couldn’t ever fathom consequences at 22 that I understand, obviously, so differently at 48,” Lewinsky reflected.

Kay Apfel

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