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Psychic didn’t see lawsuit coming after claiming she could remove witch’s curse ex-gf put on patron

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An apparently disgruntled customer may not have a lot of love for a California psychic whom he allegedly consulted in an attempt to help his marriage.

He is suing the clairvoyant, who may or may not have seen the legal action coming, for $25,000 in compensatory damages because he was allegedly defrauded.

According to several news outlets, the man gave Los Angeles-area psychic Sophia Adams, who is the proprietor of Psychic Love Specialist by Sophia, a down payment for lifting a curse.

From a tarot card reading, Adams allegedly told the man, who the media identified as Mauro Restrepo, that a witch hired by an ex-girlfriend placed a bad-luck jinx on him.

“Adams told Restrepo that unless Adams removed the curse, Restrepo and his family would be ‘unhappy and in danger,’ the suit states,” Fox 11 and City News Service reported. “Despite (Adams’) promises, (she) did not in any way help (Restrepo’s) marriage, the suit states.”

Adams reportedly wanted $5,100 for this service; according to the lawsuit, Restrepo made a $1,000 deposit.

(Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)

Allegations in the lawsuit also include negligence, civil conspiracy, and both intentional and negligent infliction of emotional distress.

The plaintiff, who claims he has suffered insomnia and anxiety, is also seeking punitive damages, which are often calculated at approximately three times actual out-of-pocket losses, and are assessed in some circumstances as a way for society to deter future alleged wrongdoing.

A complaint in a lawsuit, of course, is only a one-sided rendition of events, based on facts and applicable law as the aggrieved party, through a lawyer, perceives it. Each defendant similarly gets an opportunity to respond with their point of view as the case works its way through the legal apparatus.

Adams has not yet responded to media inquiries about the case.

The man allegedly decided to hire Adams because her website describes her as a “PHD Life Coach.”

“‘This made plaintiff more confident that he was speaking with a professional that could help him,’ according to the suit,” the news service added.

In addition to Adams and her business, Restrepo has also named Adams’ husband, daughter, and her landlords as defendants apparently under the theory that they had a legal duty to intervene and prevent the purported misconduct.

According to Adams’ website, as part of 35 years of experience, she provides “love life analysis” and “spiritual life coaching” among various metaphysical services.

“I am a true revealer of the past present and future…When visiting with me you will find that I won’t tell you what you want to hear; I will tell you what you need to know,” her website explains, in part.

In general, a dismissal for lack of sufficient evidence, an out-of-court settlement, a judgment based on the written pleadings without a trial, or a trial on the merits are among the possibilities in civil court. A particular outcome is, so to speak, hard to predict.

Robert Jonathan

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