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N.C. county pushes policy to protect America’s founding history, fire teachers who promote systemic racism

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While some school boards are pushing for Critical Race Theory and otherwise doubling down on the anti-American stance academia is becoming known for, one county in North Carolina is doing the opposite.

The Johnston County Board of Commissioners is making $7.9 million in funding dependent upon the school board accepting a policy that would discipline or fire teachers for asserting that the founding fathers of the United States were not heroes, making statements that undermine the Constitution of the United States, or asserting that racism is endemic in America (it may be presumed that this would automatically prohibit CRT).

The proposed revision to the Code of Ethics policy includes the following:

“No student or staff member shall be subjected to the notion that racism is a permanent component of American life. … All people deserve full credit and recognition for their struggles and accomplishments throughout United States history. The United States foundational documents shall not be undermined. No employee of Johnston County Schools will make any attempt to discredit the efforts made by all people using foundational documents for reform.

No fictional accounts or narratives shall be used to invalidate actual objective historical events. All people who contributed to American Society will be recognized and presented as reformists, innovators and heroes to our culture. Failure to comply with this policy will result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.”

 

The policy comes at a time when the nation remains locked in battle, as the woke left faces push back from parent groups. School board meetings have become contentious battlegrounds filled with dramatic statements. Among the most prominent of these school board battles is the fight between parents and the Loudoun County School Board in Virginia, with teachers staging dramatic public resignations, lawsuits, and Virginia Supreme Court showdowns.

The proposed policy has its critics, of course. April Lee, president of the Johnston County Association of Educators, has said that the board of commissioners is “selling our souls to the devil for $7.9 million,” as reported by the News & Observer.

“It’s basically extortion. They’re holding money hostage until they get a policy that is extreme enough for them to approve. We should all be angry about that,” Lee went on to say in her interview.

The policy is part of a broader tug of war within North Carolina. While most of the state is deeply conservative, Governor Roy Cooper is a Democrat. The state legislature has been fighting back, sending a bill, HB 324, to the governor’s desk, which he promptly vetoed. The bill would have banned schools from encouraging the idea that the United States was founded “for the purpose of oppressing members of another race or sex,” and banned the promotion of the idea of white privilege, among other things.

State Senator Vicki Sawyer, a Republican from Iredell County, mentioned the need to press on despite the governor’s veto, as reported by Greensboro.com.

“Go to your school board, talk to your members, let them know pleasantly and persistently that you do not want that indoctrination of your children,” she said.

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