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COVID antibody ‘cocktail’ used by Trump approved for ‘most vulnerable’ in UK

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The life-saving COVID antibody cocktail that was given to former President Trump last year is now being administered to the “most vulnerable” patients in the UK while Biden’s Department of Health and Human Services is rationing the monoclonal antibody treatment in the US.

“I walked in, I didn’t feel good. A short 24 hours later, I was feeling great, I wanted to get out of the hospital, and that’s what I want for everybody. I want everybody to be given the same treatment as your President because I feel great,” former President Trump said after receiving REGEN-COV when he contracted COVID-19.

The UK medicines regulator has just approved the treatment, according to the Daily Mail. The drug is called Ronapreve in the UK and REGEN-COV in the US and was developed by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals with Roche.

The Department for Health and Social Care in the UK stated on Friday that the treatment has the potential to benefit thousands of COVID patients.

“We have secured a brand new treatment for our most vulnerable patients in hospitals across the UK and I am thrilled it will be saving lives from as early as next week,” Health Secretary Sajid Javid proclaimed.

“The UK is leading the world in identifying and rolling out life-saving medicines, particularly for COVID-19, and we will continue our vital work to find the best treatments available to save lives and protect the NHS,” he added.

It will be given to patients without antibodies who are aged 50 and over, and to those aged 12 to 49 who are immunocompromised. The antibody cocktail has been shown to reduce hospital stays by up to four days and to cut the risk of death by a fifth, according to the BBC.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) concluded in August that the clinical trial data showed that REGEN-COV can be used to prevent infections, treat symptoms of serious infections and cut the likelihood of being admitted to the hospital or dying from COVID if administered early.

The trials were conducted before vaccinations became widespread and before the emergence of COVID variants.

REGEN-COV is the first monoclonal antibody combination product that has been approved for use in the prevention and treatment of acute infection from COVID in the UK. The antibodies are man-made and act like actual human antibodies within the immune system.

(Video Credit: CNBC Television)

The treatment is already licensed for emergency use in more than 20 countries including the US, Japan, and India, according to The Conversation.

It is given to patients either by injection or infusion. The drug targets the lining of the respiratory system where it proceeds to tightly bind with the virus, preventing it from breaching cells.

The Biden administration announced this week that the federal government would be taking over control of the distribution of the drug in the United States because they contend we are facing a shortage due to “a substantial surge in the utilization” associated with the highly transmissible Delta variant.

The Health and Human Services Department will now control and ration how much of the drug is provided to each state and has reduced shipments to many states including Florida in order to ensure equitable distribution, officials claim.

Florida’s supply has been reduced by more than 50% Governor Ron DeSantis said. He asserted, “We’ve been thrown a major curveball here with a really huge cut. We’re going to make sure we leave no stone unturned. Whoever needs a treatment, we’re going to work like hell to get them the treatment.”

“To just spring this on us, starting next week we’re gonna have to do that,” DeSantis declared. “There’s going to be a huge disruption, and patients are going to suffer as a result of this. And so we’re going to work like hell to make sure that we can overcome the obstacles that HHS and the Biden administration are putting in.”

The FDA has approved the use of REGEN-COV against COVID-19.

The Brits are thrilled at the approval of the drug:

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