‘Children of same foul spirit’: Confusion abounds when GWB compares domestic ‘extremists’ to Al Qaeda

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Former President George W. Bush commemorated the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks by delivering a speech at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania in which he also spoke about the threat of domestic terrorism.

His remarks about domestic terrorism drew widespread applause from leftists and condemnation from conservatives because of the shared assumption that his words were an allusion to the Jan. 6th rioters at the U.S. Capitol.

However, his description of domestic terrorists sounded far more befitting of the violent left-wing Black Lives Matter and Antifa extremists who wreaked havoc throughout 2020 — and who continue to carry out acts of violence against their political enemies.

Listen to his remarks below:

“[W]e have seen growing evidence that the dangers to our country can come not only across borders, but from violence that gathers within. There is little cultural overlap between violent extremists abroad and violent extremists at home,” he said.

“But then there’s this disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols. They are children of the same foul spirit, and it is our continuing duty to confront them.”

Is it not BLM that’s calling for a revival of segregation? Is it Antifa that proudly says “kill Nazis,” with “Nazi” being a meaningless word used to describe anyone who doesn’t share their political views? Is it not both groups that burn the national flag?

Yet for some inexplicable reason, everybody assumed he was talking about the Jan. 6th rioters who, despite engaging in genuinely deplorable behavior, had acted out for only one day and, more importantly, killed nobody — unlike BLM and Antifa.

“Eight months after the Capitol was stormed by supporters of President Donald J. Trump, Mr. Bush warned against domestic extremism,” The New York Times reported without making a single mention of the 2020 BLM/Antifa extremists.

“BREAKING: President Bush rips Trump’s insurrectionists in a 9/11 speech, saying ‘there’s growing evidence that the dangers to our country can come not only across borders, but from violence that gathers within,’ and it’s our ‘duty to confront them,'” the radically far-left group Occupy Democrats tweeted.

Not once during his speech did Bush mention either former President Donald Trump or the Jan. 6th rioters at the U.S. Capitol. Yet by no means was Occupy Democrats alone in making this false declaration.

Look:

It’s certainly possible that the former president had indeed been trying to draw attention specifically to the Jan. 6th rioters, but this is still an assumption.

Nevertheless, in part because of the left’s framing of the former president’s words, as well as the former president’s known disdain for  Trump, many conservatives also assumed he’d been referencing the Jan. 6th rioters.

This assumption in turn provoked a torrent of outrage aimed at Bush on the basis that a reference to the Jan. 6th rioters is usually a reference to all Trump supporters.

Look:

But not every conservative interpreted Bush’s words this way. Newsmax contributor and proud Trump supporter Jessie Dane Duff explained in a series of tweets that, to her, it sounded very much like Bush had been talking about “Antifa and BLM.”

She added that, to double check, she’d listened to the former president’s remarks four or five times. Yet she’d come to the same conclusion every time.

Look:

The sad truth is that what the former Bush really meant doesn’t even matter. In politics, everything is about narrative, and thanks to the vagueness of the former president’s remarks, the left now has yet another narrative to use against the right.

Vivek Saxena

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