‘I’m afraid for my life’: Jailed Jan. 6 protestor calls tv host, says he’s being denied treatment for cancer

A man arrested for taking part in the Jan. 6 protest at the U.S. Capitol Building says he’s suffering from a prolonged battle with cancer and that he is being deprived of treatment by the government.

In an interview with Newsmax TV’s Greg Kelly Tuesday evening, Chris Worrell said that he has not been given medication to treat his Non-Hodgkins lymphoma for more than 166 days because the “DC Jail general practitioners have told me my doctor’s not qualified, and he’s been practicing treating cancer patients for over 26 years.”

Worrell went on to say that he was diagnosed 16 years ago and has managed to keep the disease in check but that his condition is now “deteriorating” after being deprived of treatment during his nearly five months behind bars while being denied bail by federal courts.

“I’m afraid for my life, to be honest,” he told Kelly. “I’ve maintained my cancer at a stage one situation for well over 10 years until this happened.”

Continuing, Kelly asked Worrell if he had “any regrets” for things he “did or didn’t do” the day of the Capitol riot.

“The regrets I have…I mean, nobody I knew, talking to, during or after had any idea that anything like that was gonna occur on that day,” said Worrell. “None of us had any tendencies for anything other than to preach our First Amendment rights in protest.

“They’re just worried about their own political agenda,” Worrell continued, in reference to the government in general and the Biden administration specifically.

Worrell said that he never entered the Capitol Building itself, adding that the charges against him — assaulting and/or impeding officers using a dangerous weapon — “are completely false and fabricated,” though one photo shows him spraying what appears to be a container of pepper spray or mace at someone not in the frame.

In terms of being able to get out soon on his own recognizance, Worrell told Kelly he has “another court hearing coming up soon.”

“We’re hoping the courts are gonna see that they’re just…they’re mistreating me, they promised me treatment way back in April” after he was arrested and jailed in March, Worrell added.

“Our hope is that the court has a little bit of compassion,” he said.

Kelly then read a partial statement from one of the federal prosecutors involved in Worrell’s case saying, “I do not currently know with certainty the target at which Worrell was spraying. However, in other photographs and videos from that time of day, law enforcement officers are positioned where Worrell appears to be spraying pepper spray.”

“They don’t know, but yet they’re charging me with a crime that they have no evidence of,” Worrell responded. “What happened to our U.S. Constitution? What happened to my basic civil rights?”

Kelly then asked Worrell what he wanted to tell people.

“I’ve been denied bail, been alleged to be a white supremacist…and too dangerous to be released to my home community,” Worrell said, adding that a black man is among the 30 or so inmates being held in his DC Jail pod.

He also said that while there is a lot of violence including stabbings that occur in other pods, there have been no acts of violence committed in his.

“I remain strong because of God, my amazing wife, my son, my brothers in here, and all the great Americans supporting…us all,” he added.

Jon Dougherty

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