GOP Rep Mo Brooks invites fire with comments on Capitol Hill bomb threat

When it comes to a disturbed individual making a bomb threat on Capitol Hill, the best thing Republican lawmakers can do is to leave well enough alone — especially when it’s not exactly a secret that the media is chomping at the bit to pin it on your party.

But U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., opted to weigh in anyway — well-meaning as it may have been — granting the GOP’s media adversaries the link they desired.

On Thursday, Floyd Ray Roseberry, 49, a white male from North Carolina, parked his truck outside the Library of Congress and claimed he had a bomb, according to various media reports. In a sign of the times, Roseberry posted a Facebook Live video ranting about President Joe Biden and other key Democratic officials, calling on them to resign for “killing America.”

For what it’s worth, Congress is not in session.

While one can already see the “MAGA terrorist” headlines, with the left rushing to attribute the unhinged behavior from a man who is clearly dealing with mental health issues to millions, Brooks pushed forward with a statement that used the incident as a catalyst to encourage people to vote against socialism in the 2022 and 2024 elections.

An effort that was predictably characterized as the Republican deciding “he’d like to voice some solidarity with an aspirational terrorist, seemingly expressing empathy for a man arrested for an alleged bomb threat,” as Mediaite reported.

Brooks, who is running for U.S. Senate, started off in the statement shared on Twitter by acknowledging that he was in Alabama, before sticking his nose into DC.

“My Washington staff is accounted for and safe. I pray for the safety of Capitol Police and first responders on the scene in Washington,” the lawmaker wrote, laying down the prerequisite disclaimer that means little. “Sadly, violence and threats of violence targeting America’s political institutions are far too common.”

Brooks also called the man a “terrorist,” before going on to say he can “understand” the anger some folks have about events today.

“Although this terrorist’s motivation is not yet publicly known,” he continued, “and generally speaking, I understand citizenry anger directed at dictatorial Socialism and its threat to liberty, freedom and the very fabric of American society. The way to stop Socialism’s march is for patriotic Americans to fight back in the 2022 and 2024 elections. I strongly encourage patriotic Americans to do exactly that more so than ever before. Bluntly stated, America’s future is at risk.”

As might be expected, Brooks was “ratioed” into the stratosphere:

Forever in search of a platform, U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., a Trump-hating “Pelosi Republican” who agreed to be one of two GOP tokens — the other being U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo. — to give Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., a bipartisan label for her political effort to drag an “investigation” of the storming of the U.S. Capitol into the 2022 midterm election, jumped at the opportunity.

“Evil,” he sanctimoniously tweeted.

Of course, one tweet was not enough. Presenting himself as the conscious of the GOP, Kinzinger added another that put a spin on Brooks’ tweet that’d make Pelosi proud.

“The GOP has a decision to make,” he wrote. “Are we going to be the party that keeps stoking sympathy for domestic terrorists and pushes out truth, or finally take a stand for truth. I’ve made my decision, so has Mo. Now it’s up to GOP conference leadership to make theirs.”

U.S. Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., the star of D.C.’s version of “The Spy Who Shagged Me,” also weighed in by effectively labeling Republicans as terrorists.

“Tell us you stand with the terrorist without telling us you stand with the terrorist,” he tweeted.

As hard as it may be to believe, despite the revelation that Swalwell was involved in a sexual relationship with Fang Fang, a suspected Chinese spy Beijing sent to the U.S. to use her body as a “honeytrap,” is not only still in Congress, but still sits on the House Intelligence and Homeland Security commissions.

Tom Tillison

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