‘We’re in a pandemic when it comes to crime’: DC murders outpace COVID deaths nearly 3-to-1 in July

As Mayor Muriel Bowser imposes her latest draconian indoor mask mandate, Washington, D.C. has shockingly seen its explosive murder rate surpass COVID-related deaths in the Capitol city by a nearly 3-to-1 ratio in July.

There were 21 homicides in D.C. during the month of July compared to only eight COVID deaths according to FOX5 DC. Despite the low coronavirus death toll, Bowser, as so many of her Democratic colleagues have done, is mandating masks and pondering the lockdown of the city once again.

“We’ve put a lot of resources and time into the COVID pandemic,” Trayon White, the councilman of Ward 8, proclaimed following the July 16 killing of 6-year-old Nyiah Courtney. “We’re in a pandemic right now when it comes to crime in this community and we got to start acting it.”

The startling statistic comes as the city recorded 100 homicides on July 10. This is the earliest point that D.C. has hit that tragic number since 2003. But instead of addressing criminals, D.C. leaders and the media are blaming guns and disingenuously trying to link the pandemic to the homicides.

(Video Credit: FOX 5 Washington DC)

The D.C. police union noted that the average date over the past ten years for reaching that sobering milestone is Oct. 25. In 2018 and 2019, murders hit the 100-mark in August. In 2020, the number was reached on July 12.

At the end of July, there were 113 murders in D.C. compared to 108 in 2020 according to the Metropolitan Police Department.

The last day of July saw the tragic double-shooting of Kervin Sanches, a 31-year-old teacher who worked at the Imagine Hope Community Charter School. He was the father of four twin boys, two 8-year-olds and two 8-month-olds. Sanches was running from gunshots when he was hit. He died after being taken to the hospital. One other man was injured in the incident. No arrests have been made in the case.

According to Sanches’ fiancée, Patrice, they were to be wed in October and had just purchased their first home.

“In addition to just recently losing my friend, I have two students, one who I formerly coached who just graduated from high school that was recently hospitalized due to being shot in broad daylight in Northwest DC. And then another young man who I currently coach who was shot, maybe a week or so ago, and injured,” Marvin Moore, a friend of Sanches, sadly stated.

As for Mayor Bowser, she was seen just hours before reinstating her heavy-handed mask mandate not bothering to wear one at a function celebrating her birthday.

A photo on Twitter posted by her deputy mayor for planning and economic development, John Falcicchio, showed the mayor posing for a photo with four other people on Friday, including comedian Dave Chappelle.

Unsurprisingly, the mayor could not be reached for comment as the murder statistic was reported.

Bowser and other D.C. officials have also blamed the increase in homicides on inaction by the D.C. Superior Court because of the pandemic backlog.

“There is a lag in [criminal] case processing that is creating its own public safety crisis in Washington, DC,” Bowser wrote in a letter to the public last week. “In practical terms, what does this lag … mean for our community? It means more people are arrested and then immediately released.”

“Cases are up. Pretrial release date times are also up. The average length of stay at D.C. jail is up and the number of indictments are down,” Bowser said. “No matter how you look at it, it reflects that the system isn’t working full capacity and the administration of justice is delayed for victims, defendants, and the whole city.”

Misty Thomas, the executive director of the Council for Court Excellence, pointed out to WAMU 88.5 that the data doesn’t show whether there’s a direct link between the backlog and violent crime.

The data doesn’t “actually tell us anything particularly specific about whether the courts have altered their procedures or judges have altered their decision-making during the pandemic in a way that can show us a connection to the incidence of serious or violent crime in our community,” contends Thomas. For example, she asks, “how many of the upwards of 10,000 pending cases represent violent crimes?”

Bowser also blamed the U.S. Attorney’s Office of D.C. and the D.C. Council for the rise in crime. In fact, it appears that the mayor is blaming anyone and everyone but herself for the increase in homicides in D.C.

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