‘There’s no discipline’: Fmr. Chicago gang member laments loss of ‘gang code’ amid crime surge

According to former Chicago gang member, Peter Keller, part of the increase in crime in the Windy City is because there “is no gang code anymore.”

Keller grew up in what has been called “the world’s worst projects” before they were demolished and appeared on Fox News’ “Watters’ World” Saturday morning to comment on out-of-control crime and gang activity in Chicago.

“The gang activity really exploded in the 80s,” host Jesse Watters said. “Was that all about drugs in that decade?”

Keller pointed out that a lot was going on in the 80s. While the fathers were out looking for drugs, the mothers were charged with having to find work to support their families. This leaves the kids to their own devices and easily preyed on by the gangs.

“The kids drift off to the streets, join the gangs, the [there is a] false sense of love between the two,” explained Keller, who still has a bullet lodged in his head from his drug-dealing days. “A bunch of crack or heroin and I say now you can go get the things you need. Now you have an allowance. Now my false sense of love kicks in but I don’t tell you you will have run from the police. I won’t come to visit you while you are locked up.”

(Video Credit: Fox News)

And if Keller thinks the crime was bad then, it’s only swelled since then with some claiming that even “Al Capone wouldn’t leave home” today. Gang members now outnumber Chicago cops at a disturbing ratio of ten to one.

Keller explained that the increase in crime is due, in part, to the fact that there is no “gang code” anymore.

“They had ‘Operation Snake Head,’ when they took the various gang leaders and locked them up under the RICO Act. By being associated, you have a case now,” he said. “When they took the gangs which were the leaders of the gangs, they took each gang through the city, and the bodies started falling. When the cat is away the kids play. Now when the structure is gone. What happens? The gang members now become strictly renegades.”

Watters, a bestselling author, picked up on the distinction. “So there is no discipline,” he said.

Keller concurred, and explained that in addition to a “gang code” there was also a “go-to guy.”

“If your mom got her purse snatched you could go to somebody and say my mom got her purse snatched. Within an hour you get the purse back. The money might not be there, but you get the purse back.”

Although the leftist media likes to use examples like Chicago to argue for stricter gun control, Keller doesn’t believe that getting illegal guns out of Chicago is even remotely close to the answer to the problem.

After several stints in prison, Keller turned his life around and is helping others do the same with his outreach program United Legion One Nation.

“Our goal is to catch the kids to redirect their minds before they get into the gangs, or once you are in the gang, to get the kids out of the gang.”

Ashley Hill

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