Pentagon’s choice to probe ‘extremism’ says BLM web search raises concerns about White supremacy

Black Lives Matter, the organization responsible for many of the riots across the country last summer under the guise of racial justice, appears to have sympathizers within the Pentagon who are targeting and tracking online engagement in what they deem white supremacy.

The Pentagon has teamed up with Moonshot CVE, an extremism analysis company with ties to the Obama Foundation, to monitor web searches using key phrases to identify military bases and branches searching for the most “domestic extremist” content.

The U.K.-based company flags queries like “George Floyd deserved to die,” “Jews will not replace us” and “the truth about black lives matter.”

Moonshot CVE released a report in conjunction with the Anti Defamation League in June that claims the search “the truth about black lives matter,” suggests “that the BLM movement has nefarious motives, and is a disinformation narrative perpetuated by White supremacist groups to weaponize anti-BLM sentiment.”

“While the search phrase appears innocuous, several books include it in their title and allege that the BLM movement is ‘joined with Antifa burning and looting.’ These sources echo White supremacist disinformation narratives alleging that BLM protesters are trying to ‘overthrow the republic’ and ‘harm American citizens in a Marxist coup,’ as a means of delegitimizing it. Multiple videos on YouTube also promote these narratives – in particular the criminalization of BLM – using the identical phrase,” the company explains in its report.

The report found that from August 18, 2020- March 7, 2021, there were 511,759 white supremacist searches across the United States. From August to October 2020, there were reportedly about 330 anti-BLM searches daily. Anti-BLM searches were classified as using keywords including “BLM are looters”, “black lives don’t matter gif”, and “anti-Black lives matter t-shirt”.

Vidhya Ramalingam, Moonshot CEO, met with the Pentagon’s chief diversity officer last week according to Defense One, and while she declined to share the results of her studies, she did provide some insight:

“When we look at bases for each branch as compared to national averages, there is disproportionately low engagement on most bases. Some branches have higher levels of engagement with anti-Black extremism or anti-Semitic conspiracy theories. … But we’re not seeing really heightened levels of engagement that are incredibly worrying,” Ramalingam said.

It’s uncertain if this data from military bases will be used for anything beyond tracking and identifying these trends.

Moonshot, however, does not seem to consider the legitimate concerns that many have raised with the Black Lives Matter organization over their support for oppressive communist regimes and dictator Fidel Castro, their categorization of the American flag as “racist”, their pro-Palestine and adamant anti-Israel stance, and their questionable leader’s penchant for expensive real estate.

The Center for Security Policy raised concerns about Ramalingam’s involvement with U.S. intelligence offices, pointing to her service as a leader in the Obama Foundation’s Europe program, her participation in a controversial Southern Poverty Law Center panel, and a paper she wrote that acknowledged financial support accepted from the Open Society Foundation, a group founded by liberal billionaire, George Soros.

Fox News requested a comment from both Moonshot and the Defense Department to no avail.

Moonshot’s mission is to find and counter what it considers examples of “extremism” online. At the moment, their remediation measures include redirecting people searching queries that they deem problematic to counseling services, de-escalation methods, and “tools to learn how to critically examine media,” though it is unclear what those tools are.

In 2020, they released a similar report on extremism and election integrity.

Kay Apfel

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