1619 founder Hannah-Jones touts Cuba as ‘most equal’ multi-racial country in Western hemisphere

Sir Winston Churchill once said, “Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

More than a half-century later, Nikole Hannah Jones, the founder of the 1619 Project, seems to agree with Churchill’s equality assessment, although she may not realize it given her affinity for misinformation.

According to Hannah-Jones, “multiracial” Cuba is the greatest model for equality in the Western hemisphere and she boastfully attributes that to socialism.

“The most equal multi-racial country in our hemisphere, it would be Cuba,” Hannah-Jones had said in a 2019 podcast with Ezra Klein of Vox and The New York Times.

“Cuba has the least inequality between black and white people anyplace really in the hemisphere. I mean, the Caribbean, most of the Caribbean it’s hard to count because the white population in a lot of those countries is very, very small,” she said. “A lot of those countries are run by black folks. But in places that are truly at least biracial countries, Cuba actually has the least inequality. And that’s largely due to socialism—which I’m sure no one wants to hear.”

In a 2008 op-ed titled, “The Cuba we don’t know,” run in The Oregonian, Hannah-Jones detailed a visit she made to the island, offering much praise.

“While there, I found a Cuba you may not know. A Cuba with a 99.8 percent literacy rate, the lowest HIV infection rate in the Western Hemisphere, free college and health care,” she wrote.

“Cuba’s universal health care system is seen by many as a world model,” the liberal ideologue said. “Neighborhood clinics and municipal hospitals provide free treatment, including laser vision correction and cosmetic surgery to fix deformities. HIV and AIDS drugs cost nothing.”

One of the many complaints heard over the past week about life in Communist Cuba is the lack of basic supplies like food and water — even coffins are in short supply. A video making the rounds features a Cuban woman explaining when a loved one dies in some hospitals, the body is given to family members and they must transport it home and dispose of it however they can.

Hannah-Jones, who was gifted a Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for the 1619 Project, claimed Sunday that opposition is not about the “accurate rendering of history.”

This coming in response to opposition to a bill in Texas that bars the teaching of the 1619 Project, along with critical race theory, a divisive concept that claims America is an irredeemably racist nation and that all white people are inherently racist.

(The legislation in Texas is being presented in the worst possible light in the media, which reaches to suggest that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech would no longer be taught.)

Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, R-Texas, said the state is looking to “make certain that critical race philosophies including the debunked 1619 founding myth, are removed from our school curriculums statewide.”

“Parents want their students to learn how to think critically, not be indoctrinated by the ridiculous leftist narrative that America and our Constitution are rooted in racism,” Patrick said, according to Fox News.

The liberal media bills the 1619 Project as an accurate telling of U.S. history, but it’s anything but. Cherry-picking among the facts and distorting at will, the theory points to 1619 as the real founding of America, which is the first year slaves were brought to the country — a belief that requires accepting that America was founded for human bondage.

Hannah-Jones has falsely claimed, “One critical reason that the colonists declared their independence from Britain was because they wanted to protect the institution of slavery in the colonies.”

In a 2019 op-ed published by Politico, Leslie M. Harris, a professor of history at Northwestern University, said five academic historians signed onto a letter claiming the 1619 Project got several elements of history wrong and demanded corrections.

Among the errors noted was claiming the Revolutionary War was fought to preserve slavery.

Here are a few responses to Hannah-Jones’ tweet, offering a counter perspective:

Tom Tillison

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