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Toyota halts donations to Republicans who voted against election certification after Lincoln Project ad

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After being smeared in a Lincoln Project ad followed by an intense backlash from leftists, Toyota has announced they will no longer donate to Republicans who voted against election certification in the 2020 presidential election.

In the wake of 0f The Lincoln Project running a sleek one-minute ad bashing Toyota, the company reversed its original stance two weeks ago that proclaimed it isn’t “appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification.” The company has now veered left politically and says they will no longer donate to any candidate who objected to the certification of votes during the last election.

“Toyota is committed to supporting and promoting actions that further our democracy. Our company has long-standing relationships with Members of Congress across the political spectrum, especially those representing our U.S. operations. Our bipartisan PAC equally supports Democrats and Republicans running for Congress. In fact, in 2021, the vast majority of contributions went to Democrats and Republicans who supported the certification of the 2020 election,” the Japan-based automaker stated on Thursday.

“We understand that the PAC decision to support select Members of Congress who contested the results troubled some stakeholders. We are actively listening to our stakeholders and, at this time, we have decided to stop contributing to those Members of Congress who contested the certification of certain states in the 2020 election,” the statement added.

The auto manufacturer donated $56,000 to 38 of the 147 Republican members of Congress who insisted on verification of the Electoral College votes on January 6 according to the nonprofit watchdog Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. The Lincoln Project focused on that minuscule amount in a slick, propaganda video hit piece.

(Video Credit: The Lincoln Project)

According to the ad, Toyota’s PAC has donated to more Republicans who voted on holding up certification than any other company did. Although the company is Japanese-owned, they have a number of manufacturing facilities in the U.S. Ironically, those plants are primarily located in states such as Alabama, Arkansas, and Missippi that are historically Republican strongholds. Their reversal has the potential to significantly affect their bottom line.

All of this is tied up in the perception surrounding the Jan. 6 riot and support for former President Trump. It appears that Toyota is supporting what they perceive to be the strongest political party at the moment. A choice they may strongly regret in the future.

Meanwhile, the media is thrilled with the development and the left is rejoicing over what they consider to be another corporate scalp in their war against the right and Trump.

(Video Credit: Yahoo Finance)

“Toyota vehicles feature safety detection systems, smartphone integration, and more white nationalism than you might’ve expected,” The Lincoln Project viciously tweeted Thursday. “If they don’t reconsider where they send their money, Americans will reconsider where we send ours,” threatens a narrator during the ad attack against Toyota.

The video targeting Toyota is the first in a series from The Lincoln Project that is slated to be released in the coming weeks “targeting the workforces at companies who have broken their pledges to withhold campaign funds to Members of Congress who enabled, empowered, and emboldened former president Trump and the insurrectionists,” according to a press release.

Over 30 companies or industry PACs donated at least $5,000 to Republicans who objected to election certification. Approximately 200 corporations have now vowed to halt or reevaluate their political contributions to these lawmakers following the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

“Toyota made the right choice today,” The Lincoln Project tweeted after Toyota’s reversal.

But that reversal was slammed by conservatives who will now take their business elsewhere:

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