Teacher takes to TikTok to mock ‘supreme leader DeSantis,’ describe plan to teach CRT despite state ban

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A nail-polish-wearing middle school teacher from Jacksonville, Florida, has gone viral for mockingly describing exactly how he intends to bypass Gov. Ron DeSantis’s ban on critical race theory propaganda.

In a TikTok video reportedly published last week, teacher Jeremy Williams sought to answer the question, “How would you teach CRT if it was ‘banned.'”

“As many as of you know, I actually do teach in a state where the teaching of critical race theory has been banned, and of course I would never do anything to oppose supreme leader DeSantis,” he initially said mockingly.

But he then went on to sarcastically list out exactly how he intends to keep teaching CRT propaganda to his students despite the governor’s ban.

“It’s not in my nature to do that sort of thing, but if I were, which I’m not, I would make sure that there were lots of works by people of color in the curriculum I was teaching, I would make sure that I was having conversations about the situations those people in color find themselves in, and how things ended up that way,” he said.

“And we would make sure that we acknowledge that things aren’t happening one person at a time, but there’s systemic, systemic, systemic … you know what I’m saying … that goes on. Yeah, absolutely what I would do, but you know, I won’t.”

Watch:

While what he said may sound OK at first, and while his intentions appear to be noble, the problem is that his beliefs are rooted in a lie, namely the lie of disparate impact. This theory says that any disparity is automatic proof of racism.

And so if fewer black people obtain jobs in STEM fields, it must be because of racism. Or if fewer black students attend a school for the gifted, it must be because of racism.

This theory has real-world consequences.

A column written by activist Asra Q. Nomani last week noted how one of the country’s most prominent gifted schools, the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology (TJ), has been gutted because of this very line of thinking.

“TJ was established in 1985 as a magnet school for gifted students dedicated to studying in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM fields as they’re colloquially known,” she wrote for The Washington Post.

“But this past year, school leaders bemoaned a lack of ‘diversity’ at TJ and launched a crusade to change admissions. The student body is about 80 percent minority, but the wrong kind of minority for school officials, with about 70 percent Asian and about 10 percent of the minority students Black, Hispanic and multiracial.”

And so in response to this alleged “systemic racism,” school officials chose to completely re-engineer the school’s longtime standards.

“Tossing the merit-based, race-blind admissions exam and other rigorous standards, they instituted a ‘holistic’ admissions process with quotas and subjective criteria, such as ‘experience factors,’ that would allow them to achieve a more ‘equitable’ and desirable racial balance at TJ,” Nomani explained.

This is exactly what the foundational blocks of CRT — “systemic racism,” “equity,” “diversity,” “privilege,” etc. — inevitably engender every single time when put into actual practice. This is why so many Americans, particularly parents, oppose it.

Yet to leftists like Williams, this is exactly what’s needed to “heal the country” …

What happened at TJ is predicated on a foundational CRT principle that was best articulated by black supremacist Ibram X. Kendi, a staunch CRT advocate.

“The only remedy to racist discrimination is antiracist discrimination. The only remedy to past discrimination is present discrimination. The only remedy to present discrimination is future discrimination,” he wrote in his 2019 book.

But who gets discriminated against? To determine the answer, you must understand “intersectionality,” another foundational CRT principle that classifies people into a hierarchy based on their race, their religion, their gender, their sexuality, etc.

According to this ideology, white people (and “white-adjacent people” like Asians) are at the bottom of the hierarchy because they allegedly were always the “oppressors” in history. As such, their viewpoints and interests matter least.

Conversely, black people are at the top of the hierarchy, so their viewpoints and interests matter most.

This is why it’s fine to discriminate against Asians with affirmative action policies and “holistic” admissions policies. And this is why it’s likewise fine to discriminate against whites when it comes to relief money for farmers.

What CRT is at its core is racial essentialism, and the fact that Williams either doesn’t understand this or, worse, understands this and still supports it, has many wondering how in the world someone like him is teaching children.

Look:

The “weirdo” comment, while mean, was a reference to him wearing nail polish that one of his students gave him. Many found that to be inappropriate.

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Vivek Saxena

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