Marjorie Taylor Greene admits remorse, offers earnest apology for Holocaust comparison

U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) repeatedly apologized on Monday for comparing the imposed House mask mandate to the atrocities committed during the Holocaust after visiting the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC.

“I’m truly sorry for offending people with remarks about the Holocaust,” she stated during a press briefing Monday. “There’s no comparison and there never ever will be.”

“One of the best lessons that my father always taught me was when you make a mistake you should own it,” she remarked. “And I have a made a mistake and it’s really bothered me for a couple of weeks now and so I definitely want to own it.”

“And there are words that I have said and remarks that I have made that I know are offensive and for that, I want to apologize,” Greene said.

(Video Credit: The Hill)

She continued: “If we’re going to lead, we need to be able to lead in a way where if we’ve messed up it’s very important for us to say we’re sorry.”

Greene is known for her bombastic strong stances in the House of Representatives. The apology was apparently a rare thing for the lawmaker but she did not grovel while doing so. She admitted that she had made an error and sought to move on after expressing her regrets for the comparison.

In May, Greene spoke on a conservative podcast, “The Water Cooler with David Brody,” and compared coronavirus mask requirements implemented by Democrats who control the House to “a time in history where people were told to wear a gold star.” She went on to state that they were “put in trains and taken to gas chambers in Nazi Germany. This is exactly the type of abuse that Nancy Pelosi is talking about.”

She also called House Speaker Nancy Pelosi “mentally ill.”

The Georgia firebrand would later go on to tweet about a news story where a grocery store chain planned on allowing vaccinated employees to go maskless. A logo indicating that they were vaccinated would reportedly be placed on their name tags.

“Vaccinated employees get a vaccination logo just like the Nazi’s forced Jewish people to wear a gold star,” Greene tweeted at the time.

Greene has received intense criticism over her comments from both sides of the political aisle. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) condemned the congresswoman in a statement: “Marjorie is wrong, and her intentional decision to compare the horrors of the Holocaust with wearing masks is appalling.” He stopped short of calling for disciplinary measures: “The fact that this needs to be stated today is deeply troubling.”

As House members returned after a three-week break, Greene voiced her contrition: “Anti-Semitism is true hate,” she declared. “And I saw that today at the Holocaust Museum.”

She recounted how she had visited the Auschwitz concentration camp when she was 19.

“It isn’t like I learned about it today,” she noted. “I went today because I thought it was important.”

Rep. Brad Schneider (D-IL) is preparing to introduce a resolution in the House to censure Greene. “When @RepMTG⁩ repeatedly compared the US Covid-response to Hitler and the Holocaust, she dishonored the millions of lives lost in WWII and the Shoah,” Schneider said in a tweet. “She has forgotten America’s fight against the Nazi menace.”

This follows Republicans who are also looking to censure Squad member Rep. Ilhan Omar over remarks she made comparing the U.S. and Israel to Hamas and the Taliban. Omar has a long history of anti-Semitic remarks and stances.

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