Painful to watch: Mika threatens Morning Joe hubby with ‘marriage counselor’ over awkward on-air spat

A Morning Joe segment on police and gun reform was somewhat painful to watch Wednesday morning as married co-hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski went at it over differing views.

Married a little over a year and a half, it may be too early to assume there’s trouble in paradise, but Brzezinski did quip at the end that a marriage counselor any be in order if they don’t go to break.

Scarborough had inquired about finding out what percentage of crimes and deaths are committed by people who bought guns illegally, prompted a rather dull analysis from contributor Steven Rattner, who attacked the “gun culture” in America by proclaiming that in order for guns to be purchased illegally they must first exist.

Rattner’s logic in the face is a massive surge in crime following last year’s Black Lives Matter riots, is gun violence makes gun sales go up, which then makes gun violence go up.

Asking why crime, to include murder rates are going up, Scarborough would break from the norm and actually offer a sound reply, even as he forewarned that people — see their liberal audience — don’t want to hear the answer.

 

“Cops are back — cops are back…,” he began, before wife Mika quickly protested.

“Oh, come on,” she interrupted.

“See what I said? See what I said? Nobody wants to hear this,” he countered, before finishing his thought that “cops are back on their heels. Good cops are back on their heels.”

Brzezinski tried to bring race hustler Al Sharpton, who was on as a guest, into the mix to “add context.”

“This is retro Morning Joe!” Scarborough said at one point, in reference to their back and forth. “We’re back!”

He goes on to say it’s all about a “balancing act,”

“Two things can be true at once. We may need major reform and we do need major reform of policing in America,” Scarborough said. “This is the truth, I’m holding it in my hand.”

Mrs. Scarborough let out a heavy sigh as hubby pontificated.

“At the same time, we need to let good cops know they can do their job because… the people who are hurt most by increase in crime, it ain’t people in Westchester County and New Canaan, Connecticut,” he continued. “It’s people in like the toughest part of the Bronx, the toughest part of Brooklyn, and they and their representatives will say defund the cops, are you kidding me? We need more cops in our schools, we need more cops on the streets, we need more cops protecting us and again — and along with that, reform.”

Sharpton chimed in to say Scarborough was “right,” which seemed to indicate that he agrees more cops are needed. At the same time, he pushed for the Democrat’s George Floyd Justice in Policing Act — the controversial bill passed in the House by just eight votes, with no Republican support and opposition from two Democrats. One feature is that it allows for police officers to be sued personally.

“If we define what the law is for policing, then good cops would not be reluctant to say am I going to get hit with this or that,” Sharpton claimed. “There is no real defining of policing now in the country because it goes from episode to episode, incident to incident.”

Scarborough chimed in to say that officers don’t want to be mental health counselors and they don’t want to be marriage counselors “at 3:00 in the morning when they are knocking on doors and they don’t know if they’ll get shot or not.”

“All I’m saying is it’s a really big conversation,” Brzezinski chimed in. “If we don’t go to break, we’ll need a marriage counselor.”

“Mika, you were triggered or something,” hubby shot back.

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Tom Tillison

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