‘What do you like about being white?’ Marc Lamont Hill badgers smugly, answer instantly shuts him up

Professor and host of BET News Marc Lamont Hill interviewed conservative activist and Critical Race Theory opponent Christopher Rufo, asking him “What do you like about being white?” Rufo didn’t take the bait.

Hill tweeted out his query for the Critical Race Theory expert: “‘What do you like about being White?’ I asked this question to anti- Critical Race Theory advocate Christopher Rufo. He stated that Whiteness was always only painted as negative, so I asked him to offer something different.”

The question apparently was configured to force Rufo into defending his “whiteness.” The posited premise from Hill in itself could be viewed as racist and Rufo chose not to indulge in the racial labeling. When he would not fall for the trap, Hill tried to demand an answer and the staunch conservative was having none of it.

Hill said, “That doesn’t answer the question though,” after Rufo sidestepped the issue and dove into Critical Race Theory. “Name something you believe is positive about being white,” he again asked.

Rufo, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, replied, “Again, I don’t buy into the framework that the world can be reduced into these metaphysical categories of whiteness and blackness. I think that’s wrong. I think we should look at people as individuals. I think we should celebrate different people’s accomplishments. And again, I think the idea… you mention Ignatiev… Ignatiev says the goal is to quote ‘abolish’ the white race. In any other context, this would be interpreted as a near-genocidal slur. I don’t buy into it. The reason I’m not going to answer your question is I reject that characterization. I think of myself as an individual human being with my own capabilities and I would hope that we could both treat each other as individuals and come to common values on that basis.”

Rufo has actively gone after the racism issue. He reported on May 7 that Disneyland was implementing employee training on systemic racism, white privilege, white fragility, and white saviors. They also reportedly launched racially segregated “affinity groups” at their headquarters. His reporting got widely noticed and echoed.

Five days later, Rufo noted that Disney “has removed its entire antiracism program from the company’s internal portal, effectively scrubbing it out of existence.” Rufo remarked, “This is a major victory in the war against ‘woke capital,’” and stated that a “significant backlash from the public” was responsible for the development. A number of critics suggested that the policy was being “tweaked or rebranded, not scrubbed.” To which Rufo responded, “Possibly, but small victories start to add up. We’ve set the precedent—and forced a $329 billion company to back down.”

Rufo defined and summarized Critical Race Theory at The Heritage Foundation: “Critical Race Theory is an ideology which maintains that the United States is a fundamentally racist country and that American institutions such as the Constitution, property rights, color blindness, and equal protection under the law are vestiges of white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalist oppression—all of which must be overthrown in the name of “antiracism.” Ultimately, critical race theory and “antiracism” policies would deepen racial divisions and undermine the very institutions that are essential to addressing poverty and inequality across all racial groups. Policymakers concerned about these issues should reject critical race theory and orient public policy toward rebuilding the institutions of family, work, and education, which have been proven to lift Americans of all racial backgrounds out of poverty.”

By contrast, Hill’s less-than-solid attempt at entrapping Rufo over his race was mocked on Twitter:

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