Virginia puts Little League baseball coaches on notice for ‘anti-racist’ training

Those who want to coach Little League Baseball this year will have to undergo so-called “anti-racism training” that reportedly consists of a curriculum similar to that of Critical Race Theory, which is being taught in many of the state’s public schools.

An email was sent to coaches in Alexandria by the city’s Little League board president Sherry Reilly informing them they have to attend a workshop on May 24 entitled, “Sports Can Battle Racism,” according to the Washington Free Beacon.

“A Sports Can Battle Racism workshop document for coaches includes six core themes, from ‘Create a Caring Climate’ to ‘Model Anti-Racist Behavior.’ Coaches are encouraged to teach themselves to perceive their own ‘internalized racism’ and look for ‘potential institutional racism’ in the community. Coaches are also asked to ‘be on the lookout’ for moments that they can use as ‘anti-racism learning opportunities,’” the outlet reported.

Casey Miller, a representative with the Positive Coaching Alliance, noted that each training session could cost as much as $10,000, but the Alexandria league would not respond to inquiries about what they are paying.

“We want kids to have a positive youth character-building experience and resources and training that empower youth coaches and parents,” Miller told the Free Beacon “How we define culture is based on how we dive into the ‘we’ piece about that statement. What does it mean to be a part of the ‘we’? Each person, no matter what background or what they look like, should feel a part of the ‘we’.”

After hearing about the racism training, a number of parents grew concerned, with one, Barry Bennet of Alexandria, telling the news outlet, “This is Little League, everyone plays in every game. This is a bunch of busybodies virtue signaling. Leave ten-year-olds alone.”

The Positive Coaching Alliance’s online resource site mimics the same language used in CRT curriculum, noting that the organization “strives to be a driving force in an effort to develop solutions that work by providing coaches, leaders, parents and athletes with tools needed to battle racism and foster a culture of diversity, equity and inclusion.”

“Now more than ever is the perfect time for learning and reflection. To help assist you in this process, we’ve compiled all of our movie Discussion Guides into a list below. Here you can see guides on films that address anti-Black racism and social justice through sports,” the site, which includes a section on “black voices,” notes further.

Another resource that is focused on high school student-athletes serves to define phrases and words and features more than 30 entries. Phrases include “cultural appropriation,” “systemic racism,” and “intersectionality,” going on to tie equality to “meritocracy” and including an addendum asking “whether equality is enough” and if “equity is a more important principle.”

The guide also states that gender “transcend[s] biology” and is “very complex since people can identify in diverse ways.” The guide added that Facebook recognizes more than 70 gender options.

Further, the organization offers a quiz that allegedly gives high school athletes the chance to assess their “privilege,” noting that having a parent or guardian who has a college degree an example of privilege.

“Official partners for the Positive Coaching Alliance’s Sports Can Battle Racism Initiative include the Miami Marlins Foundation and the S&P Global Foundation. Major League Baseball’s Youth Development Foundation and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation also partner with the nonprofit organization,” the Free Beacon reported.

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Jon Dougherty

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