No wonder Dems seem so scared: Post-election data shows where Trump gained bulk of support

Former President Donald Trump has often been called a misogynist and a racist but according to a new analysis of post-2020 election data, most of his support gains came from women and voters of color.

The Washington Examiner reported Tuesday that Trump’s voter share of women and people of color rose to 57.2 percent last fall, up from 54.8 percent in 2016, based on data from Catalist, a left-wing data analysis firm.

Overall, Trump boosted his support across all racial demographics except for losing a little bit of ground with white men. Among non-white women, Trump gained 7 points; he gained 4 points with non-white men, one point with white women and lost a point with white men, the data show.

And though Democrats managed to capture a majority of Latino voters, Trump dramatically increased his support among that group.

“Along with massive increases in turnout, Latino vote share as a whole swung towards Trump by 8 points in two-way vote share compared to 2016, though Biden-Harris still enjoyed solid majority (61%) support among this group,” the progressive analyst firm noted in a report.

“Some of the shift from 2016 appears to be a result of changing voting preferences among people who voted in both elections, and some may come from new voters who were more evenly split in their vote choice than previous Latino voters. This question presents particularly challenging data analysis problems,” the firm added.

In early April, a report by Equis Labs, a political analysis firm focused on Latino voters, found that shifting his rhetoric away from illegal immigration to concerns about job losses due to the coronavirus pandemic last year likely earned him additional support from conservative-leaning Hispanics.

Also, a month earlier, Fox News’s Tucker Carlson reported that Hispanic Americans living along the newly tumultuous U.S.-Mexico border in counties that went for Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016 flipped to Trump in 2020, likely because of the former president’s ‘get tough’ approach to illegal immigration and border security.

“These are big changes, and you’re seeing them all along the Rio Grande Valley,” Carlson said.

“What the hell is going on? Well, a lot of things are going on, probably, but uncontrolled illegal immigration is definitely one of them, probably the main one. That’s completely baffling to people in D.C.,” he added.

In last year’s election, Trump also scored a 3-point increase in black voter support, according to Catalist, which noted that 2020’s results, like those of 2016, “defied” pollsters in delivering very close races in key states.

“The 2020 election was incredibly challenging and full of surprise,” the analysis said. “For the second presidential election in a row, voters defied the public polls, delivering a clear victory for Democrats, but one that was closer than many analysts expected and at a time when the two major political parties are divided on the nature and value of democracy itself.”

As for the 2022 and 2024 elections, top Republicans are warning dissenters within the party that it can’t win going forward without embracing Trump and his ‘America First’ policies.

“I would just say to my Republican colleagues, can we move forward without President Trump? The answer is no,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said Friday in an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity.

Graham went on to point out that Trump had made inroads into minority communities because they are drawn to the “Trump Republican Party.” He also said he believes Americans like his “economic populism” and “America First agenda.”

“If you don’t get that, you’re making the biggest mistake in the history of the Republican Party,” Graham warned.

Jon Dougherty

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