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Sen. Kyrsten Sinema flaunts ‘F*** off’ ring in Insta message infuriating members of her own party

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A photo of Arizona Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema went viral online Monday after she was spotted colorfully dressed and sipping on a drink, but that wasn’t all that stood out.

A closer look at the pic, which was posted to her Instagram page, revealed that she was also wearing a ring on her right index finger with the words “F**k Off.”

As it so often does, Sinema’s ‘style’ drew no shortage of responses online as she trended to start the week.

“Sen. Sinema thinks the f**k off ring is a witty way to send a message to the people upset at her actions. The reality, the fuck off ring is a gut punch to the people that worked their ass off to elect her. Shameful,” Brianna Westbrook, the Arizona co-chairperson of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ 2020 presidential campaign, wrote in response.

“Is this how she wants little girls and other women to look up to her? Her actions and behavior is an embarrassment to the senate and to powerful women; for get the party she belongs to,” another user wrote.

“We have to put up with Manchin, because he’s a wildly popular D in a very red state. We don’t have to put up with this personality disordered dimwit,” former journalist Anita Creamer added.

Early last month, Sinema angered liberals in her state and around the country by voting ‘no’ to force employers to pay their workers a minimum wage of $15 per hour.

But it wasn’t simply her ‘no’ vote, since other Democrats also opposed Sanders’ bid to sneak the provision into President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief package; it was the way she voted ‘no.’

The Arizona Democrat went viral again online in a clip showing her waltzing up to the well of the Senate chamber and dramatically flashing a “thumbs-down” sign to personnel tallying votes — which was reminiscent of the way in which the late Arizona GOP Sen. John McCain voted against repealing Obamacare in 2017.

Sinema defended her vote later in a tweet noting that it wasn’t the right time to push for a minimum wage increase.

“I understand what it is like to face tough choices while working to meet your family’s most basic needs. I also know the difference better wages can make, which is why I helped lead Arizona’s effort to pass an indexed minimum wage in 2006, and strongly supported the voter-approved state minimum wage increase in 2016. No person who works full time should live in poverty,” she wrote.

“Senators in both parties have shown support for raising the federal minimum wage and the Senate should hold an open debate and amendment process on raising the minimum wage, separate from the COVID-focused reconciliation bill,” she added.

“I will keep working with colleagues in both parties to ensure Americans can access good-paying jobs, quality education, and skills training to build more economically secure lives for themselves and their families,” Sinema vowed.

In February, another Senate moment went viral online when Utah Republican Mitt Romney was overheard on a hot mic telling his Arizona Democratic colleague a t-shirt she was wearing was “breaking the Internet.”

Jon Dougherty

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