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To bleach or not to bleach: CDC now saying ‘routine use of disinfectants’ not necessary for surfaces

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Dr. Marty Makary appeared on “The Ingraham Angle” with guest host Pete Hegseth on Friday to discuss the CDC’s revision of its guidelines which now state that the risk of contracting the coronavirus via surfaces is extremely low.

Hegseth mocked the so-called experts who had previously advised Americans to disinfect anything they touch to stop the spread of COVID-19. He specifically showcased CNN’s medical expert Dr. Sanjay Gupta, who has previously stated that the virus can live on surfaces anywhere from 24 hours up to three days.

“There is little scientific support for routine use of disinfectants in community settings, whether indoor or outdoor to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission from fomites,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday in regards to surfaces. “In most situations, cleaning surfaces using soap or detergent, and not disinfecting, is enough to reduce risk.” The CDC is claiming that studies show that the risk of catching the virus via a surface is typically less than 1 in 10,000.

The Centers for Disease Control released the guidance update noting that the virus is usually contracted through direct contact with an infected person or through airborne transmission. “It is possible for people to be infected through contact with contaminated surfaces or objects (fomites), but the risk is generally considered to be low,” the CDC stated. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC director, announced the revisions Monday during a White House briefing.

(Video Credit: Fox News)

Dr. Makary, who is a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, weighed in on the guidance revisions and what Hegseth claimed the CDC got wrong. Hegseth asked, “Dr. why do we keep putting our lives in the hands of those who keep getting the science wrong?” Dr. Makary claimed the CDC got it right but “11 eleven months late to the game.” He said that when we were telling people to obsessively wash their hands, we should have been telling them to wear a mask. He also said that when the guidance was to stay at home, it should have been to get outside.

Makary wondered aloud how the CDC didn’t know that the virus was contracted through aerosolized transmission since they knew 17 years ago that the original SARS virus was transmitted that way.

Hegseth commented that since the two viruses are so similar, wouldn’t the CDC know the general steps to take? Makary responded that they were hedging their bets and had thought that it spread like influenza. He alleged they got it wrong “big time,” mocking the “deep cleanings” as a big miss because the particles were floating in the air, not lying on surfaces.

The Fox News host also brought up that the Biden administration doesn’t want to end the lockdowns any time soon because the vaccines are not 100% “perfect.” Hegseth asked Dr. Makary, “Perfect? They have to be perfect? How does this not discourage people when the vaccine was supposed to be our hope?”

Makary said the infection is regional and herd immunity has already been achieved in certain places, so that makes no sense. He referenced “humility” in the way the experts should approach the virus, to which Hegseth quipped: “Humility… it’s in limited supply across the board in a lot of ways.”

It should be noted that the revision from the CDC comes roughly a year after stating that COVID “does not spread easily” by touching surfaces or objects. Prior to that, they had warned that “it may be possible” to contract the virus from contaminated surfaces.

The CDC is coming under fire and being mocked not only for the revision of the COVID guidelines but for recently declaring that racism is a “serious public health threat.”

(Video Credit: Fox News)

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