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Jake Tapper strikes out over MLB moving All Star game when reminded CNN has its HQ in Atlanta

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CNN anchor Jake Tapper’s so-called inside information about the “simple facts” behind Major League Baseball’s decision to pull the All-Star Game from the Atlanta area is turning out to hardly be a home run.

That’s because those Twitter users — those who apparently are able to evaluate the Georgia voting law on its substance and free of the one-sided narrative pushed in Tapper’s industry — are reminding him of an additional simple fact: CNN’s headquarters just happens to be located in Atlanta. Shouldn’t CNN also boycott Atlanta, too, they wonder?

According to a series of tweets from Tapper that got the ball rolling, the league was merely engaging in efforts to safeguard its brand and insulate its stars by following the path of least resistance (which is typically the case when corporate America succumbs to a woke mob).

“MLB officials made the decision because if they didn’t then the decision would be left to individual players, individual All-Stars, some of whom no doubt would have individually boycotted the game themselves.  In short: There was no way to avoid this becoming political.

“If MLB hadn’t acted, individual players would certainly have been asked from now until July whether they were boycotting or not. It would have — arguably — become a bigger issue.

“So @MLB did what they thought was taking one for the team, as it were, trying to protect the individual players and to operate as a cohesive whole, the source tells CNN. Whatever you think of the decision, that was part of the calculation.”

Tapper’s alleged source has a point. Some observers contend that the sports media industry has become even more left and agenda-driven than the general news industry, if that’s possible, even though sports is supposed to provide an escape from real-world concerns.

Given the way they operate, particularly in the last year or so in response to various forms of social justice activism in sports, there’s little doubt that reporters would be constantly hectoring players between now and the July 13 All-Star Game (now moved to Denver) about the Georgia law.

There’s much that could be said on this subject, but one may recall that reporters practically had a nervous breakdown even back in 2015 when they spotted a MAGA hat in then-New England Patriots QB Tom Brady’s locker.

As alluded to above, social media users responding to Tapper’s thread with a geography lesson of sorts.

“CNN’s headquarters are in Atlanta,” conservative commentator Stephen Miller succinctly wrote, for example.

“Jake, how can you work for a company headquartered in Georgia? Don’t you have a moral obligation to quit and relocate to an Alaska-or Maine-based media company if your employer won’t boycott the state?,” Hamilton Lincoln Law Institute litigation director Ted Frank asked.

Baltimore radio host Derek Hunter added that CNN fell way short in educating the public about what the legislation really entailed.

“If only someone in media had told the truth about the law, actually informed the public rather than doing their best to help Democrats by simply spitting out ‘Jim Crow 2.0!’ then maybe this wouldn’t have happened. Maybe someone working for a company headquartered in Atlanta…”

Similarly, Twitter user “Fusilli Spock” inquired about the timetable for CNN employees joining the boycott.

In a back and forth with Frank, Jake Tapper implied that he was not expressing an opinion about the decision and instead was providing insight on how MLB reached the decision.

It remains seen how this decision will affect TV viewership for the game in already ratings-challenged MLB. The NBA has not done well on TV particularly since it embraced the social justice ideology.

Parenthetically, many in the political sphere, including Democrats, have noted that the MLB decision will deny income to many small businesses in the Atlanta area, including those minority-owned.

Robert Jonathan

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