Powered by Topple

‘Completely anti-biblical’: Target selling devotional book that includes prayer to ‘hate white people’

Powered by Topple

A pastor with a church in Virginia is outraged over a book being sold by Target in their “Christian Life” section that includes a “prayer” written by a black female professor who asks God to help her “hate White people.”

The title of the book is “A Rhythm of Prayer: A Collection of Meditations for Renewal” and is written by Sarah Bessey. It contains passages from a number of authors and is selling for $14.87 on Target’s website. It was published in February and was a New York Times bestseller.

“On Saturday, one of the members of my church sent me these images of a ‘devotional’ she found in Target,” Ryan McAllister tweeted on Wednesday. He is the lead pastor at Life Community Church in Alexandria, Virginia. McAllister included photos in his post of the passage entitled, “Prayer of a Weary Black Woman” written by author Chanequa Walker-Barnes, Ph.D.

The pastor angrily pointed out that the passage is “completely anti-biblical.”

In the so-called prayer, the author implores God to help her “hate White people” or “at least want to hate them.”

“At least, I want to stop caring about them individually and collectively. I want to stop caring about their misguided, racist souls, to stop believing that they can be better, and they can stop being racist,” Walker-Barnes wrote.

She went on to explain that she is “not talking about the White anarchist allies who have taken up this struggle against racism with their whole lives.” Instead, she is referring to “nice” white people. That would include those “who are happy to have [her] over for dinner but alert the cops every time an unrecognized person of color passes by their houses.” She said that would also include individuals “who claim the progressive label but are really wolves in sheep’s clothing.”

“Let me stop seeing them as members of the same body,” she stated.

The author went on to claim that God has kept her “love and … hope steadfast even when” white people “have trampled on it.”

She specifically called out “Fox News-loving, Trump-supporting voters” and also prayed: “Lord, if you can’t make me hate them, at least spare me from their perennial gaslighting, whitemansplaining, and white woman tears.”

Another passage is even more abhorrent: “Lord, if it be your will, harden my heart. Stop me from striving to see the best in people. Stop me from being hopeful that white people can do and be better. Let me imagine them instead as white-hooded robes standing in front of burning crosses.”

Walker-Barnes tweeted on Wednesday that she authored the prayer “after a white person — someone I would have called a friend at the time — dropped the N-word in a casual conversation.”

She noted that her grandfather and great-grandfather were able to escape a South Carolina sharecropping farm and run to Florida in the 1900s. Her alleged friend caused her to meltdown over the N-word in connection to her family history and she proceeded to take her “rage to God in prayer.”

“In all truth, my family and my personal experiences have given me millions of reasons to hate white people,” she viciously proclaimed. “The hatred would be justified. I could even find biblical precedent for it.”

Target describes the book as “a trusted space where people seek help, hope, and peace, energized by God and one another.”

The outrage on Twitter was palpable:

Comments

Latest Articles