Leo Terrell slams left for taking a page out of ‘Al Sharpton’s playbook’, using racism to bully companies

Fox News contributor and civil rights attorney Leo Terrell on Tuesday told “Fox & Friends” that Democrats were taking a page from the “Rev. Al Sharpton’s playbook” on bullying companies by weaponizing racism in connection to the Georgia voter integrity bill.

“In Georgia, they’ve made it easier to vote, harder to cheat,” Terrell declared.

Terrell pointed out the uncomfortable truth of that matter that even though the MLB’s All-Star game was moved in retaliation for what the left calls a “suppressive” voter law, Georgia actually has more early voting days than Colorado does. The action appears to be purely political because their objection makes no sense here.

“The argument is corporations are intimidated by the allegation of racism. That’s the Al Sharpton playbook. You intimidate, you accuse someone of racism. And they back down. And that’s why Coca-Cola and all these corporations are afraid of that label,” Terrell stated.

(Video Credit: Fox News)

Terrell went on to allege that corporations are terrified of being charged with racism and that these types of claims are now rampant in America.

“I mean, a couple of days ago, the Portland School District was talking about it, a tree being racist. It’s out of control, totally out of control,” Terrell remarked. “And it’s all about power.”

Terrell elaborated further on the MLB’s hypocrisy and wrote on his website:

The boycott was a result of the Leftist narrative that Georgia’s new voter ID law is racist. However, Colorado already has voter ID laws and is less diverse than Georgia. The Colorado Secretary of State’s website states “All voters who vote at the polls must provide identification. If you are voting by mail for the first time, you may also need to provide a photocopy of your identification when you return your mail ballot.”

So, the MLB has decided to take their business to Denver, Colorado, which is 10% black, from Atlanta, Georgia, which is 52% black, in an effort to fight the “racist” voter ID laws that exist in both states.

This decision could be a nice case study demonstrating the Left’s commitment to their narrative over the facts. It’s a reminder that the Left chooses, as Oprah Winfrey put it, “your truth” over the truth. An idea promoted by President Joe Biden, probably accidentally, when he told Iowans “we choose truth over facts.”

Georgia’s HB 531 election reform bill was criticized by dozens of corporations when it was signed by Gov. Brian Kemp into law last week after the Republican-led legislature gave it the green light. Some of those companies include UPS, Delta, JPMorgan, Coca-Cola, American Airlines, Citigroup, Home Depot, Apple, Microsoft, and the list goes on as major companies go woke and fall in line.

Delta CEO Ed Bastian took it a step further and sent a memo to employees stating that he wanted to “make it crystal clear that the final bill is unacceptable and does not match Delta’s values.” Which, in effect, would silence employees who had a different opinion out of fear of losing their jobs.

“The right to vote is sacred. It is fundamental to our democracy and those rights not only need to be protected but easily facilitated in a safe and secure manner,” he said toeing the politically correct line. “After having time to now fully understand all that is in the bill, coupled with discussions with leaders and employees in the Black community, it’s evident that the bill includes provisions that will make it harder for many underrepresented voters, particularly Black voters, to exercise their constitutional right to elect their representatives. That is wrong.”

Bastian also claimed that the rationale for the law is “based on a lie: that there was widespread voter fraud in Georgia in the 2020 elections. This is simply not true,” he said. “Unfortunately, that excuse is being used in states across the nation that are attempting to pass similar legislation to restrict voting rights.”

“Voting is fundamental to the health and future of our democracy. JPMorgan Chase employees span the United States and as state capitals debate election laws, we believe voting must be accessible and equitable,” JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon also intoned in a statement.

Coca-Cola Chairman and CEO James Quincey chimed in stating that the company is “disappointed in the outcome of the Georgia voting legislation.”

“Voting is a foundational right in America, and we have long championed efforts to make it easier to vote,” Quincey echoed others’ talking points. “We want to be crystal clear and state unambiguously that we are disappointed in the outcome of the Georgia voting legislation. Throughout Georgia’s legislative session, we provided feedback to members of both legislative chambers and political parties, opposing measures in the bills that would diminish or deter access to voting.”

Coca-Cola’s focus “is now on supporting federal legislation that protects voting access and addresses voter suppression across the country.”

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