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‘Even worse’: MLB strikes out with proposed All-Star Game relocation spot

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Major League Baseball officials are mulling relocating the All-Star Game from Atlanta to Coors Field in Denver, though Colorado has the same voter ID requirement and fewer early voting days than Georgia.

Several outlets reported the development Monday, noting that the Colorado Rockies would be hosting the annual game on July 13 instead of the Atlanta Braves.

The league moved the game out of Georgia following an outcry by Democrats, corporations headquartered in Atlanta, and left-wing pundits that a new voter reform law unfairly targeted minorities.

Rob Manfred, MLB commissioner, announced Friday that the league would take the game away from the Braves after GOP Gov. Brian Kemp signed the new reforms into law.

“Over the last week, we have engaged in thoughtful conversations with Clubs, former and current players, the Players Association, and the Players Alliance, among others, to listen to their views,” Manfred said in a statement.

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box. Fair access to voting continues to have our game’s unwavering support,” he added.

But several people pointed out on social media Monday that Colorado has the same voter ID requirement for in-person voting as Georgia under the new law, and even fewer days when voters can cast ballots in advance.

Also, “campaign workers” can provide refreshments to voters waiting in line in Colorado, but they “may NOT campaign or wear any apparel or accessories bearing the name or image of a candidate, political party, or ballot measure if they operate within 100 feet of the polling place,” says the Colorado secretary of state’s website.

The new Georgia law allows poll workers to provide voters with refreshments while standing in line, but like the Colorado law, it, too, prevents “electioneering” via refreshments and food adorned with a candidate’s name, image, and message. 

“Already in November there were cases of candidates handing out water to voters in line, food trucks giving out food or selling it wrapped in campaign flyers and other instances of trying to influence voters,” a Georgia election official told the Washington Times in late March. “But even some poll managers looked the other way because it was only water or snacks.”

Fox News also reported that in Colorado, voting centers open 15 days before election day, though in Georgia, they are open at least 17 days beforehand including weekends.

“We’ve expanded early voting. It was 16 days, set as the minimum in the state. It’s now set as 17,” GOP Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger said in late March of the then-pending legislation.

“We also allow the counties that want to do this, they can have two additional Sundays of voting, which makes it 19 days. That is a record. So, we’ve actually expanded access, and no one’s talking about that,” he added.

“There’s no rational argument against requiring state ID – provided for free to those who don’t have a driver’s license – for absentee ballots. The left said that photo ID for in-person voting would suppress votes. It didn’t. Registration and turnout soared, hitting new records with each election cycle,” he noted.

Dr. Alveda King, niece to Martin Luther King Jr., who preached in an Atlanta church, also pushed back on allegations by Democratic operative Stacey Abrams and others that the new law restricts minority access.

“I’m not going to join an effort that would say you don’t need any regulations, you don’t need any controls, and that is just not reasonable. It’s not protecting our right to vote, it’s not protecting the voters,” she told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto on Friday. 

“[T]his is not an effort for voter suppression, this is simply trying to regulate it and get a hand on what happened on the last election because we had so many dead people voting, people voting twice, people mailing it in and showing up voting,” she added.

“I marched for our voters’ rights and fought for our voters’ rights. I’m 70 years old. I’ve been voting a long time,” King said. “Without appropriate regulations, you do not have the fair voting process.”

Jon Dougherty

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