Cleaning our oceans the private-sector way

Op-ed views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author.

Woke Corporate America loves recasting its business policies to be viewed as “carbon neutral,” and improvement at the margin is doable. But no one mentions how they will reach this lofty goal at a national level without a massive increase in nuclear energy, or other sources of energy that are not renewable or climate friendly.

This corporate virtue-signaling comes at the expense of scientific facts and reality. It ignores two things the nation will truly need in the years and decades ahead: more energy and a cleaner world. But how do we get there? We constantly hear about big trillion-dollar government solutions, but the private sector is the engine that creates freedom, wealth, and opportunity. The private sector, responding to the needs of the marketplace, drives innovation, and as such, we should be looking to the private sector for answers.

Let’s face it, we live in a plastic society. Nearly everything we buy is wrapped or packaged in some form of plastic. When we eat fast food, order take-out meals, or even stop for an iced coffee, we’ll be handed plastic cups, forks, spoons, and straws. We’ll use them once and then throw them away.

But that’s not the end of the story for plastic waste. It’s only the beginning. Of the 8.3 billion tons of plastic waste that exists today, barely any is recycled. Most of it is thrown away and goes to landfills or ends up in our oceans. In the ocean, plastic bottles take 450 years to degrade.

This is bad for the oceans, the creatures that live in them and for the planet as a whole. It’s also wasting what could be a useful resource for providing some of the energy we need. Plastics start out as petroleum products. We mainly think of petroleum as the gasoline we use to power our cars and generate electricity for our homes, but petroleum-based products are everywhere. Modern fabrics, shoes, the phones we depend on, and the water bottles we drink from are all petroleum-based products. So is the plastic waste clogging our oceans. The good news is that much of this waste can be converted into clean burning fuels or back into oil for generating energy, and there’s a company focused on making that happen.

Clean-Seas is a wholly owned subsidiary of Byzen Digital Inc. (OTCB: BYZN). Byzen acquires and operates leading companies and technologies focused on clean energy and sustainable solutions. Clean-Seas is targeting plastic pollution, on land and in our oceans, and it has come up with a free-market method of dealing with this waste stream. Clean-Seas is looking to partner with governments and municipalities as well as with other companies to commercialize its processes for turning plastic waste into energy.

It would do this through plastic pyrolysis. This is a process which has been under research for several years but the Clean-Seas team believes it’s now matured enough to change the plastic waste paradigm[JHS1] . Plastic pyrolysis is a groundbreaking technique that utilizes a chemical reaction combined with heat and pressure to breakdown existing plastics, transforming them into clean burning fuels from which gasses are captured (syngas) to then be used to generate clean electricity or clean hydrogen, along with other valuable commodities.

Acquiring the plastic is yet another opportunity; someone has to pick it up and process it. In the Clean-Seas model, cleaning up the plastic waste that’s clogging our oceans will provide numerous good, private-sector jobs particularly in developing countries. What Byzen’s Clean-Seas is really building is an economic ecosystem in the private sector that will clean up the natural ecosystem in our oceans. It’s economical, it’s practical, and it’s forward-thinking.

Today we have a world in which plastic waste ruins our beaches and harms wildlife. Clean-Seas, mission is to help solve this crisis and end up with cleaner oceans, cleaner air, and the clean energy we will undoubtedly need to power our lives, homes, churches, schools, and jobs — all while lifting people out of poverty.

Powered by Topple

Michael Busler

Comments

Latest Articles