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Gutfeld shreds ‘Marxist agitprop’ Teen Vogue for editor-in-chief resigning: ‘Pathetic and disgusting!’

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The Five‘s Greg Gutfeld went on an extended tear against Teen Vogue and spoke passionately in defense of Alexi McCammond who resigned as editor-in-chief after tweets she wrote when she was 17 surfaced that were viewed as racist and homophobic.

Conde Nast and McCammond agreed to part ways after blowback from Teen Vogue staffers concerning tweets from years ago where she made derogatory comments against Asians and voiced homophobic slurs.

“I became a journalist to help lift up the stories and voices of our most vulnerable communities. As a young woman of color, that’s part of the reason I was so excited to lead the Teen Vogue team in its next chapter,” McCammond wrote. “My past tweets have overshadowed the work I’ve done to highlight the people and issues that I care about —issues that Teen Vogue has worked tirelessly to share with the world — and so Conde Nast and I have decided to part ways.”

She added: “I should not have tweeted what I did and I have taken full responsibility for that. I look at my work and growth in the years since, and have redoubled my commitment to growing in the years to come as both a person and a professional.”

(Video Credit: The Five)

McCammond’s former colleague at Axios, Jonathan Swan, came to her defense after she resigned: “‘If we can’t as an industry accept somebody’s sincere and repeated apologies for something they tweeted when they were 17 years old, what are we doing?”

He also said: “I was upset to see this because it really is just a very stark example of if we can’t allow ourselves to forgive people when they did something or said something or tweeted something when they were 17 years old, and there is no indication in their current professional lives that they harbor these views, not a single indication, I don’t know what we’re doing here really.”

Ulta Beauty pulled their advertising from Teen Vogue over the tweets. Others followed suit and there were a number of complaints as well as a petition demanding McCammond resign.

Gutfeld accused Teen Vogue of “basically Marxist agitprop.” Then he ardently asked his co-hosts: “Is this practice still worth it? Is it still worth it if you can take down ten other white people but you have to sacrifice one young Black woman who probably doesn’t deserve it?”

He then nailed Juan Williams: “I’m so disappointed… in you.” Gutfeld went on to ask, “Where are the mentors?”

He pointed out that the same rules did not seem to apply to MSNBC’s Joy Reid who was called out for homophobic posts and proceeded to lie about them. He wanted to know why Reid didn’t stand up for McCammond: “Given her experience and her success, shouldn’t she have the guts to demand Conde Nast stick to their guns and fire their damn news staff — because they can — and protect this young woman?”

“What about Don Lemon?!” Gutfeld practically shouted. “Don Lemon has a voice! He’s successful, he’s black. Why doesn’t he come to the aid — where are the mentors of color who are defending these people?”

Then the co-host of The Five expressed his opinion of the company at the heart of the incident: “Conde Nast are a bunch of cowards, they’re pathetic and disgusting.”

Juan Williams jumped back in and tried to put Gutfeld in his seat: “Greg, this has nothing to do with race. I don’t think it’s right to bring race into this.”

But Gutfeld was having none of that argument and he laughed while stating, “Okay, Juan, way to miss the point. I said stand up for people!”

“You said, ‘Where are the Black mentors?’ I don’t think that’s what this is about, Greg,” Williams countered. The segment ended shortly after that exchange.

McCammond has been in the news recently due to her connection with former White House deputy press secretary T.J. Ducklo. He resigned in February after he was suspended for threatening a Politico reporter who was doing a story on their relationship.

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