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Don Lemon’s ‘startling’ remarks on black Jesus draws ire of anti-Semitism groups

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To hear the liberal media tell it, bigotry is a one-way street in America heading due right, which exempts CNN’s Don Lemon from his racially motivated dogmatism.

Lemon is plugging his new race-baiting book and he appeared in the friendly confines of “The View,” to say if Americans will just recognize that Jesus was a man of color and hang pictures displaying this in our homes, we can finally eradicate racism.

The problem being that in the process of “teaching the true history of this country, the history that African-Americans brought to this country,” Lemon essentially said that black and brown Jews don’t exist and it did not escape the notice of those who battle anti-Semitism.

“We have to start teaching the true history of this country, the history that African-Americans brought to this country. And we also have to start being realistic about God and the Bible,” Lemon said. “If you are a person of faith in this country, and we know America is built on faith and religious freedom, then we have to — I think a good way of starting is to present the true identity of Jesus. And that is as a black or a brown person, rather than someone who looks like a white hippy from Sweden or Norway.”

The idea of Don Lemon lecturing America on the realities of God and the Bible being quite a stretch, considering he once said, “Jesus Christ — if that’s who you believe in — Jesus Christ, admittedly was not perfect when he was here on this earth.”

(Video: ABC)

“I think we should start with a true depiction of what Jesus looked like and put that in your home,” Lemon said. “Either a black Jesus or a brown Jesus, because we knew Jesus looked more like a Muslim or someone who is dark, rather than someone who is blond, a blond-looking carpenter.

“And when your children ask you, ‘Who is this?’; ‘This is Jesus. Jesus was Middle Eastern.’ Bethlehem was not in Sweden. Jesus doesn’t look like the popular depiction we have in our churches and our homes and that we see all over the media,” he added. “And I think that’s a good place to start. And that’s a good place that your kids will ask questions and then you can go from there and then we can come to a true reality about what America really is. And then try to figure out how we fix this issue of racism in the country. It is a spell that must be broken.”

Michael Dickson, the executive director of the pro-Israel group StandWithUs, turned to Twitter to inform the CNN host he had “inadvertently contributed to the erasure of Jewish identity.”

Dickson tweeted: “You told people to ‘present the true identity of Jesus, as a black or brown person, more like a Muslim or someone who is dark.’ Jesus was a Jew.”

In a follow-up, he reminded Lemon that Jesus was “a dark-skinned, Jew hailing from Bethlehem in Judea, the ancestral Jewish homeland.”

“You rightly asked for a truthful conversation about who Jesus was in order to foster understanding,” Dickson tweeted. “Omitting the actual truth erases the very identity, heritage and birthplace of Jewish people. It also denies the diversity of Jews, who are black, brown, white and everything in between. I am sure this was not your intention and hope you will correct the record. I would be happy to discuss more.”

StopAntisemitism.org agreed with Dickson’s assertion in responding to his tweet.

The tweet said: “The erasure by a top CNN reporter is quite frankly not only startling but frightening.”

Here’s a sampling of other responses to the story from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

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