Friendly ‘diplomacy’ or intimidation? Guam Nat’l guard visits MTG’s office after calling them foreign

At the Conservative Political Action Conference, Republican Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene mistakenly referred to Guam, which is a U.S. territory, as a foreign land and that earned her a visit from the Guam National Guard, replete with cookies.

“I’m a regular person. And I wanted to take my regular-person, normal, everyday American values, which is, we love our country. We believe our hard-earned tax dollars should just go for America, not for what? China, Russia, the Middle East, Guam, whatever, wherever,” Greene stated in February at CPAC. “If we want to build roads, if we want to put money into schools, if we want to build border walls, we want it right here at home. This is easy to me; it’s easy to us, but it’s not easy to Washington.”

In response, Guam Rep. Michael San Nicolas and a whole contingent of the Guam National Guard were recorded traipsing towards Greene’s office on Monday where, unfortunately for them, she was not in attendance. That did not stop them from leaving cookies as a reminder that they are part of the U.S. They called it “cookie diplomacy.”

An aide, however, did greet them. “Thank you guys so much for all that you do. We really appreciate it. Thank you guys for keeping us safe,” the aide told them.

(Video Credit: Forbes Breaking News)

San Nicolas promised to bring Greene cookies and carried through on that vow. Guam’s governor, Lourdes Aflague Leon Guerrero, also offered Greene books on Guam’s history. Director of communications Krystal Paco-San Agustin stated: “We would be more than happy to send Representative Greene’s office a copy of ‘Destiny’s Landfall: A History of Guam.'”

“Congresswoman Greene is a new member, and we will be paying a visit to her and delivering delicious Chamorro Chip Cookies as part of our ongoing outreach to new members to introduce them to our wonderful island of Guam,” San Nicolas informed The Guam Daily Post.

Two-time former chairman of the Republican Party of Guam, Phil Flores, called Greene’s office. He spoke to one of her assistants.

“I said Guam is a part of America. We have been for 122 years,” relayed Flores. “I’m calling to educate her.”

He stated that Greene’s comments and lack of knowledge concerning Guam “was really disappointing.”

“You see it every once in a while, ‘Where’s Guam?’ And obviously, we don’t expect to be as well known in the mainland as perhaps California or New York, but more people should know about this wonderful part of America,” Flores declared. “I’ve done much traveling in Asia … and people in Asia know about Guam, especially here in Korea, Taiwan, Japan. But if you go to some places in the states … they will not know about Guam.”

Sen. Telena Nelson, who chairs the legislative committee that includes federal affairs, remarked that Greene’s comments were “appalling” coming from a member of Congress.

“This is not the first time, nor will it be the last, that our island is mistaken for foreign soil when the fact remains that we have been woven into the fabric of the United States for over a century,” she proclaimed. “Our mutually beneficial relationship with the United States has long afforded us many privileges, however, our people and our many contributions remain unknown and unimportant to many Americans. This urges us to not only continue making our island known, but to also amplify our voices and implore our national and federal governments to give Guåhan and our people the committed support we need in our quest for self-determination.”

Guam has been a U.S. territory for more than 120 years and bills itself as “Where America’s day begins.” Its people have been U.S. citizens since 1950.

The visit brings to mind Democrat Rep. Hank Johnson stating in 2011 that Guam would tip over and capsize. That faux pas was dismissed but Greene’s mistake was evidently taken as an insult and a politicized military sent her a message.

There was anger on Twitter over the visit:

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