‘Sounds like a plantation’: Aunt Jemima’s long awaited rebrand flops pretty spectacularly

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Much like the Washington Redskins, whose name was hounded out of existence last year by members of the “woke,” the 131-year-old pancake syrup Aunt Jemima is no more.

On Tuesday PepsiCo., the parent company of Quaker Oats, announced that Aunt Jemima, which was named after a real black woman, will be re-branded as the Pearl Milling Company starting around June of this year.


It turns out that Pearl Milling Company was the name of the company that originally created the renowned pancake mix known as Aunt Jemima.

“Pearl Milling Company was founded in 1888 in St. Joseph, Missouri, and was the originator of the iconic self-rising pancake mix that would later become known as Aunt Jemima,” Pepsi explained in a press release.

Aunt Jemima has been renamed because of concerns about “racial stereotypes.”

“The Quaker Oats Company signed the contract to purchase the Aunt Jemima brand in 1925. It updated its image over the years in a manner intended to remove racial stereotypes that dated back to the brand origins,” the press release continued.

“In June 2020, the company announced it was transitioning from the Aunt Jemima name and likeness on packaging and pledged a $5 million commitment to support the Black community.”

PepsiCo and Pearl Milling Company are now planning to spend more money to ostensibly benefit the black community.

“In the coming weeks, Pearl Milling Company will also announce the details of a $1 million commitment to empower and uplift Black girls and women, inviting the community to visit its website and nominate non-profit organizations for an opportunity to receive grants to further that mission,” according to the press release.

“This is in addition to PepsiCo’s more than $400 million, five-year investment to uplift Black business and communities, and increase Black representation at PepsiCo,” it continued.

Whether or not their clear-cut virtue-signal will actually be appreciated by the black community is another matter altogether, because it turns out that some of the people whom they purport to be so concerned about don’t seem to support the name change.

Take the descendants of Nancy Green, the original Aunt Jemima, as well as the woman allegedly responsible for coming up with the recipe for the popular pancake mix.

She’s just not a character … I really want her legacy to be told. That this is a real person. And this was her recipe. And she fed the world from her flapjacks,” her descendant, Marcus Hayes, told ABC News last August.

No time ever have I heard anyone in my community say that this image was one that was derogatory. So I don’t know where that sentiment is coming from,” Hayes added.

From white liberals, perhaps?

Listen:

Vera Harris, the descendant of Lillian Richard, one of the black models who were hired by Quaker Oats to represent Aunt Jemima, also wasn’t pleased by PepsiCo’s move.

I was, I was taken aback. I was really shocked. I knew people didn’t realize that those were real people and, you know, to phase them out, would kind of erase their history,” she said to ABC News.

And that’s indeed what’s happening. In their misguided quest for perceived racial justice and equality, businesses such as PepsiCo, whose CEO is a white man, are erasing black history.

At the time of the interview last August, Hayes was hopeful that, at the very least, Aunt Jemima’s new name would pay tribute to Green.

“We don’t know what it could be called as long as she is somewhere in the mix. Call it ‘Nancy Greene’s,'” he said.

But PepsiCo didn’t even do that. Instead it chose a name that, according to critics, sounds almost like a slavery company or plantation.

Look (*Language warning):

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Vivek Saxena

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