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‘The View’ hosts shamelessly defend screening questions ahead of WH briefings: ‘It’s not a gotcha session’

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On Wednesday, “The Viewcohost Joy Behar aggressively defended the White House’s stance over screening reporters’ questions in advance. She contended that press conferences should not be inundated with “gotcha questions” that target press secretary Jen Psaki.

Behar hotly defended the White House telling reporters what they can and can’t ask: “First of all let’s talk about whether they’re actual specific questions or areas of discussion, and, you know, this type of press conference is not supposed to be gotcha questions, they’re supposed to be informative information questions and answers, and so it behooves the administration to be prepared to give the correct information.”

“Jen Psaki — what’s her name Psaki? Jen Psaki, she can’t know everything, you know. I mean — and she — and by the way this idea that she can come up with spin, I think the reporters are quite aware of when someone is spinning and when they’re not, and that they would call her out on that, and this administration is very well prepared to say the truth, whereas the last one would just lie and spin and whatever,” Behar continued.

She added: “But you know, I mean, I just think it’s not a gotcha session. That’s what has to be understood.”

Cohost Whoopi Goldberg laughed at reporters who are grumbling over the development: “You know, some White House reporters aren’t very happy that there was requests from the White House to get press briefing questions in advance, and it has them raising red flags about the Biden administration’s promise of total transparency according to The Daily Beast. Does it occur to everybody that they have been in there probably for three weeks, and they might not have all the answers — have all the answers yet? Call me crazy.”

Meghan McCain jumped in at that point and stated that she had real issues with submitting questions from journalists in advance. She called it “highly un-kosher” and “unorthodox” for any White House to do such a thing.

“Maybe we are all living in different worlds,” McCain stated, “but, I have worked on campaigns, I’ve been around many politicians, I’ve helped politicians, I’ve never once been in a situation where I said ‘hey, you as a journalist can you give me this question for the principal in advance,’ that’s not how it works.”

She went on to point out that if Psaki and the White House try to play by a different set of rules now that former President Donald Trump is gone, “it’s going to end very badly.”

Experts are warning that screening briefing questions before they are asked of the press secretary may destroy trust in the media. They claim viewers could very well conclude that the media is in bed with the Biden administration. Many feel that way already.

After it was reported that the White House would screen questions in advance, Biden’s communication team shrugged it off, claiming that it was manufactured drama.

“Our goal is to make the daily briefing as useful and informative as possible for both reporters and the public. Part of meeting that objective means regularly engaging with the reporters who will be in the briefing room to understand how the White House can be most helpful in getting them the information they need. That two-way conversation is an important part of keeping the American people updated about how government is serving them,” a White House spokesperson reportedly told Fox News.

And then you have cohost Sunny Hostin who chalked it off to all of us living in a “whole new world” under the Biden administration.

“Let’s face it. I mean, this is a world of difference from what we were dealing with before. The last administration was not transparent. It was opaque at the very best… We’re talking about we’re coming from the Mooch, Sarah Huckabee, and Kayleigh McEnany, you know, the liar-in-chief press secretary, you know, so we’re in a whole new world, and so, you know, if the Biden administration has given us — I think it’s just a breath of fresh air,” she gushed.

The justifications for advance screening are all in the name of transparency: “So the fact that they’re asking for, you know, area, topic areas or even questions, I still think we’re in a much better place in terms of transparency, and isn’t that what we want I think from our government?” Hostin argued.

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