Ric Grenell doubles down on claim Susan Rice is the ‘shadow’ president calling the shots

Former acting Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell said that, based on President Joe Biden’s initial executive actions, he believes someone else is actually setting the agenda — Susan Rice.

Grenell raised eyebrows earlier this month when he first said he believes that Rice, who was President Obama’s UN ambassador and national security adviser and is now serving as Biden’s domestic policy director, is calling the shots in the current administration.


“Susan Rice has been tapped to do domestic policy, and what is really interesting about that is she’s got no experience in domestic policy,” Grenell, who served as acting DNI and U.S. ambassador to Germany under former President Trump, said. “She is going to be somebody who is incredibly influential. Remember that she was National Security advisor so she knows that entire apparatus.”

Grenell repeated his views Monday in an interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo.

“Look, I’ve said it before but I think it’s worth repeating…she’s been given a portfolio as to domestic policy. We all know that that’s a joke,” he said. “She doesn’t know anything about domestic policy, but she’s run the national security portfolio, she certainly has run the UN portfolio, she knows the State Department and really wanted to be the secretary of state.

“So, there’s no question that she’s running domestic and foreign policy,” Grenell continued, adding that Vice President Kamala Harris would be spending “most of her time in the Senate” serving as a tie-breaker vote in the evenly divided chamber.

“Susan Rice is extremely excited that Vice President Harris is preoccupied in the Senate, and the shadow presidency of Susan Rice is front and center, there’s no question about that,” added Grenell.

The former acting DNI went on to comment on a host of other policies being pursued by the Biden White House that are departures from the Trump administration, including rejoining the World Health Organization, the Paris Climate Accords, and investing in Chinese companies banned by Trump directives.

Grenell noted that the previous administration prioritized strengthening “alliances” that were mutually beneficial to the United States including NATO, whose member nations, he said, were pressured by Trump into contributing their required share of military resources after decades of neglecting their agreement.

In terms of the Paris accords, Grenell said under Trump the U.S. “continued to lower our CO2 emissions.”

“Our political will is rock-solid toward improving environmental policies,” he explained. “The reason we got out of the Paris accords is that other countries are not politically astute enough to realize that they have to make progress personally on lowering CO2.”

Calling it an issue of “political will,” Grenell accused other countries of merely talking about lowering emissions but actually failing to implement policies to do so.

“They want [the U.S.] to pay for it, and President Trump said ‘no, if you don’t have the political will to lower the CO2 emissions in your own country, why do you think that the Americans paying you to lower CO2 is gonna make a difference?’” Grenell said.

As for Rice, her name was being floated early in Biden’s campaign as a potential running mate.

During her tenure in the Obama administration, she was widely criticized for repeatedly claiming that an obscure video sparked the Sept. 11, 2012, terrorist attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi.

The attack left four Americans dead including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens.

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Jon Dougherty

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