Mitch McConnell accuses Trump of provoking Capitol riots in stunning betrayal from Senate floor

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell delivered stunning remarks on the Senate floor accusing President Trump of provoking the violent crowd that beset the U.S. Capitol on January 6.

The Kentucky Republican, who was just reelected in November, stabbed Trump in the back on the president’s final full day in office, saying he “provoked” the “mob” with lies about the election. McConnell’s comments come ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden on Wednesday and before a pointless Senate impeachment trial of the outgoing president.

“The last time the Senate convened, we had just reclaimed the Capitol from violent criminals who tried to stop Congress from doing our duty,” McConnell said as he opened the session on the Senate floor Tuesday.

“The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people,” he added as the full Senate met for the first time since the January 6 violence that led to the death of a Capitol Police officer and several others.

(Source: C-SPAN)

“And they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government which they did not like,” McConnell continued.

“But we pressed on. We stood together and said an angry mob would not get veto power over the rule of law in our nation, not even for one night. We certified the people’s choice for their 46th president,” he added.

“Tomorrow President-Elect Biden and Vice President-Elect Harris will be sworn in. We’ll have a safe and successful inaugural right here on the west front of the Capitol, the space that President Bush 41 called democracy’s front porch,” McConnell said.

Following the fallout from the violence at the nation’s capital, extra security measures have been put in place for Wednesday’s inauguration. A massive deployment of 25,000 National Guard troops are in Washington, D.C. and have been vetted by the FBI over fears of an insider attack.

“And then we’ll move forward,” McConnell continued on Tuesday.

“Our work for the American people will continue, as it has for more than 230 years. There are serious challenges that our nation needs to continue confronting, but there will also be great and hopeful opportunities for us to seize,” he said.

“Certainly November’s elections did not hand any side a mandate for sweeping ideological change. Americans elected a closely divided Senate, a closely divided House, and a presidential candidate who said he’d represent everyone,” the lawmaker went on.

“So our marching orders from the American people are clear: we’re to have a robust discussion and seek common ground. We are to pursue bipartisan agreement everywhere we can and check and balance one another respectfully where we must. And through all of this we must always keep in mind that we’re all Americans. We all love this country, and we’re all in this together,” McConnell concluded.

But the GOP leader, who accepted Democratic President-elect Joe Biden’s invitation to attend church with him ahead of the inauguration, may be getting his own marching orders as Trump supporters are not likely to forget his final act of betrayal.

 

Frieda Powers

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