Powered by Topple

Cancel culture comes for Justice Clarence Thomas over wife’s alleged tweets

Powered by Topple


The far-left cancel culture is in full gear following the protest Wednesday at the U.S. Capital that got out of hand, even targeting Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, who is no stranger to “high-tech lynchings.”

Not that Thomas did anything. No, it’s because his wife allegedly expressed support for the tens of thousands of Trump supporters who came to DC to peacefully protest the results of an election that they believe to be illegitimate — never mind that Ginni Thomas tweeted her presumed remarks well before a smaller faction of protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol.

 

 

Mark Joseph Stern, a “staff writer” at Slate, tweeted screenshots of what appear to be tweets from Mrs. Thomas — her account is now private.

Our liberal hero breathlessly reported: “On the morning of Jan. 6, Ginni Thomas — wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas — endorsed the protest demanding that Congress overturn the election, then sent her “LOVE” to the demonstrators, who violently overtook the Capitol several hours later. She has not posted since.”

What Stern is doing here is equating ALL Trump supporters to a few that went too far.

His crack reporting also offered as background that Ginni Thomas is “a conservative lobbyist and avid Trump supporter who campaigned for him.”

He claimed she spreads “fringe conspiracy theories on Facebook,” comically listing as an example that Thomas recently posted, “No one, and I mean no one, has done more to harm America than the Democrats.”

Sorry pal, if you want to convince someone of conspiracy theories, you’re going to have to do better than that; damn near half the country agrees with that assessment.

To get a feel for how insane the left has become in post-Obama America, there was an immediate response by those easily misled by the “media outrage machine,” to call for Justice Thomas to resign over his wife’s tweets.

No, seriously.

Naturally, you can always depend on “Joy-less” Behar, co-host of The View, to pile on, riding the wave of perceived popular opinion, ever fearful of being left onshore.

But then, this overreaction is not limited to easily-influenced social media users.

Just ask Sen. Josh Hawley, who saw publishing giant Simon & Schuster cancel the publication of his book after hundreds of people stormed the U.S. Capitol.

Simon & Schuster said in a statement that it “cannot support Senator Hawley after his role in what became a dangerous threat to our democracy and freedom.”

What did the Missouri Republican do?

He exercised the legal option to object to the Electoral College tally in Pennsylvania, alleging that state officials unconstitutionally changed voting rules ahead of the Nov. 3 election.

That’s it.

Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles