Near unanimous vote to ratify Arizona Electoral College results; six GOP senators hold ground to object


Objections to the Electoral College votes from Arizona were overwhelmingly rejected by the U.S. Senate during debates in Congress.

Arizona’s results were ratified after the Senate completed its debate, voting 93 to 6 on Wednesday to reject the objection to the state’s slate of electors. In the end, only six Republican senators, led by Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, held their ground in objecting to Arizona’s electoral votes, after two hours of debate before both the Senate and the House voted on accepting the results.

The objection was offered by Cruz and Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona during the Senate’s debate Wednesday. But, after returning to the chamber following the chaos that erupted at the Capitol building, the effort failed to get the needed majority of votes to reject the electors.

The initial objection in the Senate sparked a moment of applause and a standing ovation.

Republican Senators Cruz, Josh Hawley of Missouri, Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi, John Kennedy of Louisiana, Roger Marshall of Kansas, and Tommy Tuberville of Alabama were the only lawmakers in the Senate to hold to the Arizona objections.

The number was less than expected as it appeared some senators changed their minds following the violent interruption that temporarily halted the proceedings.

Trump campaign legal adviser Jenna Ellis noted that the poor showing in the Senate marked a sort of milestone.

“The Republican Party is officially over today,” she wrote in a post that was flagged by Twitter.

(Image: Twitter/Jenna Ellis)

More than half of the Republicans in the House agreed with the objection to Arizona’s results, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and Minority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana.

Gosar condemned the violence that broke out earlier when protesters stormed the building, but he made it clear he was still objecting to results from Arizona.

“I am proceeding with my objections on behalf of Arizona” he tweeted before returning to the House floor.“Leftist violence—or any violence— will not deter our mission for truth and transparency. The people need and deserve the truth.”

“In a representative form of gov’t we must be able to trust that our elections accurately represent the will of the American voter,” Biggs said on the chamber floor.

The state’s electoral votes were finally accepted since both chambers of Congress did not end up rejecting the results, with 83 House Republicans not joining their colleagues in objecting.

Ultimately, the move to throw out Arizona’s results was defeated in the House 303 to 121, with Reps. Gosar, Andy Biggs, and Debbie Lesko standing their ground in the effort to overturn the state’s results.

Following the final certification of Joe Biden as the winner of the 2020 election, President Trump issued a statement vowing “there will be an orderly transition on January 20th.” The president’s video message addressing the mob violence in Washington D.C. was removed by Facebook and Twitter which claimed it would only incite more violence.

Frieda Powers

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